The Marines get it

Discussion in 'Military' started by CSM, Oct 14, 2005.

  1. CSM
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    CSM Senior Member

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    Los Angeles Times
    October 14, 2005

    Marines Hit Recruiting Goal, Won't Lower Bar

    By Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer

    SAN DIEGO — Unlike the Army, the Marine Corps met its national recruiting goals for the fiscal year ending Sept. 30 and has no plans to lower its standards for recruits, officials said.

    The Marine Corps achieved 102% of its goal for enlistments in the reserves and 100% of its goal for active-duty enlistments, according to figures released by the Defense Department.

    The Army's figures were 84% for the Army Reserve, 80% for the National Guard, and 92% for its active-duty force. As the nation's largest service, the Army needs to attract a larger number of recruits than the Marine Corps, the Navy or the Air Force.

    To aid in its recruitment program, the Army announced last week that it had increased from 2% to 4% the percentage of recruits it would accept who score near the bottom of the military aptitude test, so-called Category IV recruits.

    The Marine Corps will continue restricting Category IV recruits to 1% of the total, officials said.

    Also, Army officials said they were lowering from 67% to 60% the Army's goal for signing recruits who scored in the top half on the aptitude test.

    The Marine goal remains 63%. In the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30, 69.5% of Marine recruits scored in the top half of the test, said Master Sgt. James Edwards of the recruiting command at Quantico, Va.

    With casualties mounting in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Army and Marines have found recruiting more difficult. Overcoming opposition from parents of potential recruits is often the biggest challenge, officials said.

    Both services have added recruiters. For several months this year the Marine Corps missed its monthly goal for recruits.

    Military sociologist David Segal, director of the Center for Research on Military Organization at the University of Maryland, said the Army's recruiting problems are partly due to a decade-long decline in enlistments among African Americans, who have come to doubt whether the military is an equal-opportunity employer.

    The Marine Corps has a smaller percentage of African Americans in its ranks and thus is not as affected by the decline, Segal said. African Americans make up 23% of the Army and 12% of the Marine Corps, according to a recent Government Accountability Office study.

    Also, Segal said the Marine Corps has done a better job of overcoming opposition among parents of all races to having their children enlist. "My sense is that more Marines come from Marine families so the parents are already on board," he said.

    Marine recruiters send a video to the parents of would-be recruits explaining how boot camp will make their son or daughter more physically fit and more mature. School counselors are invited to visit boot camps at San Diego and Parris Island, S.C.

    For fiscal 2005, the Marine Corps had recruited 8,350 men and women for the reserves and 32,955 for the active-duty force. Of the four services, only the Army missed its active-duty recruiting goal. The Army had hoped to enlist 80,000 recruits but fell short at 73,373.

    The Air Force Reserve (113%) and Marine Reserve (102%) exceeded their recruitment goals.

    The Army and Marine Corps differ in their advertising pitches to potential recruits.

    In their pop-up ads on the Internet, for example, the Army says, "Join the U.S. Army. Discover all the opportunities the U.S. Army has to offer," while the Marine Corps asks "Do you have what it takes? Contact a Marine recruiter."

    In one of the Army's television ads, an African American youth tells his mother he is enlisting so that he can earn money for college.

    In a TV ad that debuted Oct. 1, the Marines emphasize the demands of boot camp.

    "The main thing we show, or sell, if you will, to young men and women are the intangibles: self-discipline, service to country, service to team," said Maj. Joe Kloppel, spokesman for the Western Recruiting Region based in San Diego.

    "Those things don't change with the economy," he said.
     
  2. nosarcasm
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    nosarcasm Active Member

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    one of my neighbours applied to the Marines. He unfortunatly had a drug
    habbit. Crystal Meth. He failed his first drug test. THe Marine Lt. in
    command of recruiting here in Boise gave him the advice to drink
    a lot of Cranberry juice and vinegar mix and not do the drugs.

    He did and passed the drug test on the 2nd try. Then he was in
    the weekend preparation thing with the Marines.

    He was scheduled to go to bootcamp. He still continued his drug habbit.
    Before bootcamp the Marines did another drug test. He failed
    again and was dishonoably discharged.

    That guy also had a criminal youth record and an outstanding warrant
    from another state that caught up with him later.

    It seems to me that all the talk about high standard his
    less then truthfull.

    The events I described happened in Winter 2004.
     
  3. theHawk
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    theHawk Registered Conservative

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    How is that not high standards, they caught him doing drugs when he was told not to and was kicked out.


    Sounds to me like they're doing exactly what they are supposed to be doing.
     
  4. nosarcasm
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    nosarcasm Active Member

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    I was surprised that after he failed the first drug test they told
    him how to clean his system and give him another one.

    I am sure the official regulations don't allow for that leeway.
     
  5. no1tovote4
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    no1tovote4 VIP Member

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    I'm very surprised. The Marines are not in a shortage for enlistment, there is no need to lower their standards. Each Marine recruiter tells me that they were told to never enlist a man they wouldn't want to serve with, or who they don't think can be a Marine.
     
  6. nosarcasm
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    nosarcasm Active Member

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    well the person in question is a good guy per se, and fortunatly in
    jail beat the drug problem and does neither take drugs nor drink anymore.
    Maybe they just wanted to give him a chance. Its hard
    to expolate from one sample on the population of applicants.

    I have read in the press about US army recruiters that
    got in trouble for not meeting the quota. THis probably encouraged
    their transgressions.

    It still remains to be seen if the armed forces can attract enough recruits
    for the continued war effort. Raising benefits has already attracted
    some new recruits.
     
  7. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    It's called giving someone an opportunity to get out of their rut. Had the applicant been sincere and discontinued his drug use, th eopportunity to change his life was there. He obviously was not sincere, and he didn't get a second break.

    A lot of us took that opportunity and have never looked back.

    Point is, you have to want to be a Marine more than you want to be a piece a shit. If you do, they will put your ass to work, but they will also take better care of you than any other branch of service, IMO.
     
  8. pegwinn
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    pegwinn Top of the Food Chain

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    Lowering standards allows people to feel better about themselves for no good reason. It also makes them easier targets and contributes to increased SGLI payments.
     
  9. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    Had he shipped, he'd have been dropped once the results of his ENTNAC came back. If nothing else, he'd have been put on admin hold until he resolved his legal issue IF it was simply paying a fine. If he had to appear, his ass would be going home.

    At any rate it's just a admin discharge for fraudulent enlistment; which btw, DOES carry a max 5 years in prison and $10k fine under the USC for making a false statment on an official US gov't document. I've never seen anyone prosecuted for it though.
     
  10. pegwinn
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    pegwinn Top of the Food Chain

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    I didn't wanna get into the rest of it as the asserter was already in over his head, and trying to tread water and hold an ACME anvil in his teeth. But, like the man says....... YOU, are correct sir!

    Birthday coming up, you going to the ball?
     

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