The Great Corporate Tax Swindle: Dozens of Companies Pay CEO More Than IRS

Discussion in 'Economy' started by hvactec, Sep 3, 2011.

  1. hvactec
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    hvactec VIP Member

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    America's CEOs are truly in a league of their own when it comes to pay and power.

    Total CEO pay at the largest 292 corporations averaged 325 times what the average worker made in 2010, a far higher ratio than in any other Western nation. This figure had actually declined from an incredible 525 times the typical worker’s wage in 2000. But the CEOs of the Top 100 are truly in another stratosphere. They averaged an astounding 1,723 times what their workers earned in 2007, according to Les Leopold’s excellent book, The Looting of America.

    The Washington, D.C.-based think tank Institute for Policy Studies has come up with a different, but equally stunning, way of gauging CEO pay by making a simple comparison. For its new report, Executive Excess 2011, the IPS placed the compensation packages of America's Top 100 CEOs alongside the tax bills of their corporations, and discovered that

    Of last year’s 100 highest-paid U.S. corporate chief executives, 25 took home more in CEO pay than their company paid in 2010 federal corporate income taxes.

    U.S. corporations and their stooges in Congress, including some Democrats, frequently whine that the U.S. corporate tax rate is far too high for U.S. firms to remain competitive. In fact, the multitude of loopholes mean that the official 35% tax rate is almost never imposed. Corporate tax rates for U.S. firms are actually among the lowest among the 30 advanced nations belonging to the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development, reports Citizens for Tax Justice:

    According to a 2007 study by the Bush Treasury Department, between 2000-2005 US corporations paid only 13.4% of their profits in corporate income taxes, well below the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) average of 16.1%.

    Just in case those figures are too complex for the average congressperson to comprehend, the IPS study offers some very memorable facts:

    • ZERO OR LESS TAX BILL: Fully 25 of the 100 firms paid no U.S. corporate taxes for last year, and in fact gained tax refunds.

    • MORE ON LOBBYING THAN TAXES: No less than 20 of the 25 firms spent more on lobbying than they paid in taxes, no doubt because in some cases the lobbyists helped craft the obscure language of the tax legislation and regulations. The “investment” of these giant corporations thus paid off very handsomely.

    • DONATION TO CANDIDATES MORE THAN TAX BILL: Campaign contributions were similarly a great investment for 18 of the 25 no-tax firms which “gave more to the political campaigns of their favorite candidates than they paid to the IRS in taxes.”

    • SKY-HIGH PAY: The 25 tax-dodging CEOs the IPS report spotlights “averaged $16.7 million in pay last year, well above the $10.8 million Standard & Poor’s 500 CEO average."

    • TAX-HAVEN HEAVEN: The use of these tax havens”—like the Cayman Islands, Bermuda, and Panama—which collude with corporations in concealing assets from the IRS—proved to be another highly profitable maneuver.

    These tax havens provide U.S. firms with the privilege of setting up a foreign "subsidiary"—often consisting of merely a mailbox—to which it can assign ownership of brand names, logos, and other valuable "intellectual property rights."

    The U.S. branch of the corporation is then charged huge fees for the use of this intellectual property, thereby dramatically reducing the firm’s profits on paper. The advantages of the tax havens made them popular with 72 percent of the no-tax corporations

    read more The Great Corporate Tax Swindle: Dozens of Companies Pay CEO More Than IRS - Working In These Times
     
  2. RadiomanATL
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    RadiomanATL Senior Member

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    General Electric Co., CEO Jeff Immelt picked up $15.2 million in 2010, while the company got a $3.3 billion federal refund and invested $41.8 million in its own lobbying and political campaigns.

    Who says you can't buy the White House?
     
  3. Brutus
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    Brutus Senior Member

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    Lucky for you I went to college and can explain:

    1) corporate taxes are expenses like any others and so are passed on to customers. Corporations are tax collectors, not tax payers. Ever wonder why a jet plane costs customers more than an apple? Because the costs in making the jet pplabe are greater than for growing an apple. So, corporate taxes should be eliminated. This is a huge day for you. We have corporate taxes only because politicians like to pander to the pure and perfect economic ignorance of liberals

    2) If any CEO's pay was too high it would provide an opportunity for the competition so there is no need for you to worry about it. Freedom takes care of it. You don't need to worry that Ford may pay too much to union labor or executive labor or sheet metal. Republican competition will drive them into bankruptcy if they pay too much,i.e, more than world wide competitors. This is a huge huge day for you!!!

    Sorry


    2)
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2011
  4. SFC Ollie
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    SFC Ollie Still Marching

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    I personally could care less how much some CEO makes. Some people are simply jealous. But if I did have that kind of money I would probably give more of it away than what I spent....
     
  5. RadiomanATL
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    RadiomanATL Senior Member

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    Lucky, I went to college and can tell you that 3) always comes after 2).

    And I can also tell you that $3.3BILLION net refund is not "eliminating corporate taxes". Thats called a political payoff.

    You're welcome.
     
  6. Flopper
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    Flopper Gold Member

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    The GE tax department is really one of largest and best tax law firms in the country. Reducing corporate tax rates and cutting out all the loop holes will benefit small businesses who can't afford an army of tax lawyers. Tax lawyers produce nothing, draw large salaries, and owe their jobs to Congress.
     
  7. RadiomanATL
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    RadiomanATL Senior Member

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    GE getting $3.3 billion of taxpayer money benefits small businesses? I don't think so.

    I would be fine with the elimination of corporate taxes. However it's the refunds that stick in my craw.
     
  8. Flopper
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    Flopper Gold Member

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    Often high paid CEOs don't live up to the Board's expectation and do present a competitive advantage to the competition. A high priced CEO is no guarantee of big profits.
     
  9. Flopper
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    Flopper Gold Member

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    No, I'm saying smaller businesses would benefit from a simpler lower corporate tax because they would need less professional help with their taxes in addition to lower rates.
     

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