"The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today (1873)"

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Wry Catcher, Jul 8, 2010.

  1. Wry Catcher
    Online

    Wry Catcher Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2009
    Messages:
    37,238
    Thanks Received:
    4,915
    Trophy Points:
    1,160
    Location:
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Ratings:
    +11,497
    "A novel by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner, which explores political and economic corruption in the United States. The central characters, Colonel Beriah Sellers and Senator Abner Dilworthy, are tied together in a government railroad bribery scheme. Twain and Warner depict an American society that, despite its appearance of promise and prosperity, is riddled with corruption and scandal."

    "Two general themes caused tension during the Gilded Age:

    1. Laissez-faire: a doctrine opposing government interference in economic affairs beyond the minimum necessary for the maintenance of peace and property rights." Source: Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary (1990).
    2. Concentration of power in the hands of the government at all levels - local, state, and federal. Government during this period assumed more authority and power, especially expanding its bureaucratic control and authority. Major areas of expansion of government power included land policy, railroad subsidies, tax/tariff policy, immigration policy, and Indian policy."

    For more history, please see this link:
    H102 Lecture 04: The Gilded Age and the Politics of Corruption
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  2. Baruch Menachem
    Offline

    Baruch Menachem '

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Messages:
    14,203
    Thanks Received:
    3,235
    Trophy Points:
    185
    Ratings:
    +3,308
    Mark's best stuff was his reporting. Innocents Abroad is still a fun read.

    His single best effort was in A tramp Abroad, where he eviscerates the German language.

    Russian is worse. They have six cases
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  3. editec
    Offline

    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    41,426
    Thanks Received:
    5,595
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Maine
    Ratings:
    +5,630
    Huck Finn is probably his master opus.

    Here is the online audio version.

    If you haven't read or at least listened to this book, you really are missing one of the quientessentially AMERICAN masterpieces.
     
  4. Baruch Menachem
    Offline

    Baruch Menachem '

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Messages:
    14,203
    Thanks Received:
    3,235
    Trophy Points:
    185
    Ratings:
    +3,308
    good story. too bad he pulled his punches as the end.

    It should have ended where the Duke and Dauphin get rode out of town on the rail, but he had to make a happy ending.

    Wry Catcher reminds me a bit of old man Finn
     
  5. JakeStarkey
    Offline

    JakeStarkey Diamond Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    Messages:
    152,715
    Thanks Received:
    13,744
    Trophy Points:
    2,165
    Ratings:
    +42,112
    I have read Huck Finn twice a year for decades. In my humble opinion, one does not understand America without understanding baseball and "the River and a Boy".
     

Share This Page