‘Stunning’ Drug Lab Scandal Could Overturn 23,000 Convictions

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by shockedcanadian, Mar 29, 2017.

  1. shockedcanadian
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    shockedcanadian Gold Member

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    Disgusting. This morally bankrupt piece of trash shouldn't see the light of day again. So many lives ruined.


    A Massachusetts lab scandal could mean 23,000 dropped drug convictions

    In the annals of wrongful convictions, there is nothing that comes close in size to the epic drug-lab scandal that is entering its dramatic final act in Massachusetts.

    About 23,000 people convicted of low-level drug crimes are expected to have their cases wiped away next month en masse, the result of a five-year court fight over the work of a rogue chemist.

    "It's absolutely stunning. I have never seen anything like it," said Suzanne Bell, a professor at West Virginia University who serves on the National Commission of Forensic Science. "It's unbelievable to me that it could have even happened. And then when you look at the scope of the number of cases that may be dismissed or vacated, there are no words for it."

    The dismissals will come in the form of filings from seven district attorneys ordered by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court to decide who among 24,000 people with questionable convictions they can realistically try to re-prosecute.

    Their answer, due by April 18, is expected to be "in the hundreds," a spokeswoman for Middlesex County District Attorney Marian Ryan said this week. An exact number was not available because the prosecutors are still working through the list, the spokeswoman, Meghan Kelly, said in an email.

    The prosecutors didn't want the scandal to end like this. They fought for a way to preserve the convictions, and leave it to the defendants to challenge them.

    Civil rights groups and defense lawyers argued for all the cases to be dropped, saying that was the only way to ensure justice.

    The state's high court chose its own solution, ruling in January that district attorneys should focus on a small subset of cases it wanted to retry, and drop the rest....

    Many of those convicted through Dookhan's work likely did commit the offenses, but many did not, defense lawyers say. All of them are now burdened with dubious convictions that have made it difficult to find jobs and housing or to obtain student loans, the lawyers say. Some defendants were convicted of more serious crimes, and the drug convictions were used to stiffen their sentences. Non-citizens have been threatened with deportation.

    Civil rights advocates say the case has exposed the folly of aggressive enforcement of low-rung drug offenders, many of whom are addicts in need of treatment.
     
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  2. Mousterian
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    Mousterian VIP Member

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    Collateral damage, happens in all wars, even the silliest ones.

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  3. bear513
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    bear513 Gold Member

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  4. Tipsycatlover
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    Tipsycatlover Gold Member

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    Ohh an immigrant from Trinidad. Next time hire an American. Drug test.
     
  5. JOSweetHeart
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    JOSweetHeart Gold Member

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    I hope that someone has the ability to sue whoever is responsible for this. Why should anyone be able to get away with something this severe?

    God bless you always!!!

    Holly
     

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