Students must speak English before entering Public Schools

Discussion in 'Education' started by Jackson, Jan 14, 2011.

  1. Jackson
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    Jackson Gold Member Supporting Member

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    Teachers are not trained to teach non English students. When you have a classroom, half of which are non English speakers, how do you expect the teacher to get her lessons across to these students?

    I propose that that a federal law, or at best states pass laws that immigrant children must pass a an English Proficiency test before register in schools. Esl teachers can be hired and paid by the tuition of their students to teach them English so they have a chance to be successful in school and enter on an even playing field.
     
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  2. Intense
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    Intense Senior Member

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    School districts are required to provide critical educational notices, letters, and forms in the parent's native language. In addition, interpreters should be available at parent meetings and orientations.

    New York City schools offer bilingual education and English as a Second Language (ESL) programs to students who are not proficient in English to provide them with an equal educational opportunity. The student's parent may decide whether they want his or her child to take bilingual education or ESL. Every public school should offer an ESL program. However, not all schools will offer a bilingual education program.

    In addition, many schools in New York City receive Title I funds and offer assistance to students with limited English proficiency using these funds. You may ask your school about services under Title I.

    Every parent or guardian who registers a child for school will complete a home language identification survey that asks about the languages spoken by the child and other people in the child's household. Based on the answers to this survey, the child may be required to take a Language Assessment Battery (LAB) test. If the child scores below the 41st percentile on the LAB test, he or she will be classified as an English Language Learner (ELL) and required to take either bilingual education or ESL. The child may also have the option of taking a Dual Language/Two Way Model or an Accelerated Academic English Language Model (available for grades 4 to 9).

    Bilingual education is a program of instruction that uses the child's native language and English. Bilingual education is designed to help the child retain ability in his or her native language, learn the academic subject areas, and learn English. Bilingual education classes include ESL methods.

    ESL is a program that teaches a child English using only the English language.

    The Dual Language/Two Way Model integrates native English speakers and native speakers of another language for all or most of their content area instruction.

    The Accelerated Academic English Language Model is a program where English language arts is integrated with content area learning, and ESL techniques are used throughout all of the instruction.

    For more information about bilingual education and ESL, please visit the NYC Department of Education's Web site.

    MOIA - Bilingual Education
     
  3. Sunni Man
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    Sunni Man Diamond Member

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    Many kids in school today speak a modified form of ebonics :cool:
     
  4. Sheldon
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    Sheldon Senior Member

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    Students must speak English before entering public schools? Que?

    What better place for a foreign student to learn a new language that at a school? Secondary languages are learned faster when you hear them spoken by native speakers.

    At my high school there were juniors and seniors taking fourth or fifth year Spanish that would tutor ESL students after school.

    Most ESL students seemed eager to learn the language and become integrated in the hallways. I think the system going right now is fine. And no need for an additional federal law for this; it's something best handled at the local school district level.
     
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  5. chanel
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    chanel Silver Member

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    I have two Indian students who barely spoke a word of English before September. In three months, they are doing very very well. ESL programs are helpful, but I don't believe in bilingual ed. If Indian kids can learn in English, so can Hispanic students.

    I teach five Hispanic kids. Several of them only speak Spanish at home. They are also doing very well and are not "losing" their native language. That argument is foolish.
     
  6. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    I agree our schools should only teach the first 8 grades in english.
    Students after grade 8 should be able to take elective courses in foreign languages though as it has always been.
     
  7. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    or redneckphonics, yankeephonics, etc.
     
  8. syrenn
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    syrenn BANNED

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    I dont think they should be required to speak English, just that no special programs will be paid for by the state to teach them English. San Francisco has "immersion schools" where only the target language is spoken to students. All assignments and homework are given in the target language. If this is considered a "privileged" school program.

    Non English speaking students should think of themselves as privileged to be in an English immersion school. How about that!
     
  9. Jackson
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    Jackson Gold Member Supporting Member

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    I am familiar with the ESL programs and once taught an Egyptian child English. (I was a Title I teacher...) But these youngsters still do not come in on a even playing field and do not reach the higher functions of comprehension when they are still struggling with meaning of words and phrases.

    At best once the student has mastered the language, which most likely would put him months behind in actual skills (reading), a prudent teacher would clearly examine his test scores for understanding the content and deem it necessary for him to repeat the grade.

    Rather than that, I would like to see the child go to a An English Proficeincy School school before the first grade and master the language. BTW, Our ESL teacher never had an English word posted in her classroom. It was all Spanish.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2011
  10. CMike
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    CMike Zionist, proud to be

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    I do not concur.

    Children should not have to learn english before going to speak, however, schools still should teach in english.
     

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