Street Justice -- Soviet Style

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Sheldon, Dec 16, 2010.

  1. Sheldon
    Offline

    Sheldon Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    5,215
    Thanks Received:
    1,328
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Ratings:
    +1,330
    Russian Motorists Viciously Beat Drunk Driver On Video

    There's a graphic (but not too graphic) video in the link. Basically this drunk Ruski drives his Hyundai into a bunch of other cars in traffic. The other drivers get pissed, the traffic cops get pissed, and this dude gets beat up in the middle of the street by all of them.

    Someone needs to tell these people that traffic jam =/= hockey game
     
  2. PoliticalChic
    Offline

    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Messages:
    55,677
    Thanks Received:
    15,586
    Trophy Points:
    2,190
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    Ratings:
    +24,807
    OMG- it was Rodney King!!!
     
  3. Baruch Menachem
    Offline

    Baruch Menachem '

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Messages:
    14,204
    Thanks Received:
    3,235
    Trophy Points:
    185
    Ratings:
    +3,305
    First guy on the scene was a cop, who was way out of line. I can see why he wanted to get away so badly if the cops were going to behave like that.

    Sort of explains why he came out swinging. He knew it was going to be bad. He just made it seriously worse.

    He should pay for all 20 cars. They are expensive there. (Well, same price as here, but wages are a lot lower)
     
  4. PoliticalChic
    Offline

    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Messages:
    55,677
    Thanks Received:
    15,586
    Trophy Points:
    2,190
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    Ratings:
    +24,807
    Wasn't that a Trabant he was drivng?

    The Trabant is an automobile that was produced by former East German auto maker VEB Sachsenring Automobilwerke Zwickau in Zwickau, Sachsen. It was the most common vehicle in East Germany, and was also exported to countries both inside and outside the communist bloc. The main selling point was that it had room for four adults and luggage in a compact, light and durable shell. Despite its mediocre performance and smoky two-stroke engine, the car is regarded with derisive affection as a symbol of the failed former East Germany and of the fall of communism (in former West Germany, as many East Germans streamed into West Berlin and West Germany in their Trabants after the opening of the Berlin Wall in 1989). For advocates of capitalism it is often cited as an example of the disadvantages of centralized planning as even refueling the car required lifting the hood, filling the tank with gasoline (only 24 litres[1]), then adding two-stroke oil and shaking it back and forth to mix. It was in production without any significant changes for nearly 30 years with 3,096,099 Trabants produced in total.
    Trabant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     

Share This Page