Stolen Valor Act ruled Unconstitutional

Discussion in 'Law and Justice System' started by Navy1960, Aug 4, 2010.

  1. Navy1960
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    Navy1960 Senior Member

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    A man from Colorado who was masquerading as a hero had a lucky break with the federal judge who handled his case, according to a feature on the Navy Times.

    Rick Glen Strandlof reportedly made claims that he was a former Marine who had been wounded while serving in Iraq. He said that he was the recipient of the Purple Heart and the Silver Star, but the military did not have any record that he was in the service. Because of this he was charged with violating the Stolen Valor Act, which stipulates that it was a crime to claim that one has won a military medal when it was untrue.

    The case, however, was dismissed by U.S. District Judge Robert Blackburn, who ruled the law was unconstitutional.
    Stolen Valor Act Ruled as ?Unconstitutional? by Judge! | Navy SEALs Blog by USNavySEALs.com

    Those that pose or make false claims do nothing but dishonor all those who have actually made the sacrifices and often times given their lives for this nation. It is is the lowest form of disrespect and for a Judge to see this act as a form of Free Speech when it is nothing short of theft is beyond me.
     
  2. Ravi
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    Ravi Diamond Member

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    If he didn't receive anything of value from his pretense he is a loser not a criminal so I think the judge made the right decision.
     
  3. Lonestar_logic
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    Lonestar_logic Republic of Texas

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    He doesn't need to receive anything of value for him to violate the "Stolen Valor Act" dumbass!

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  4. Navy1960
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    Navy1960 Senior Member

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    Great Falls - A 19-year-old Washington, D.C., man who was arrested at a Montana airport has pleaded guilty to impersonating an FBI agent and saying he had a gun in his carry-on bag to see how personnel would respond. He says he wanted to observe how security responded.
    The United States Attorney’s Office announced that during a federal court session in Great Falls, Malik Hannabal Shabazz., a 19-year-old resident of Washington, D.C., pled guilty to false impersonation of an officer of the United States
    Criminal Justice student pleads guilty to impersonating FBI agent

    The reason I put that there is simple, there is no difference between a person that would impersonate an FBI officer and one who would wear the uniform or make false claims of valor i.e. awards they did not receive or rank they did not achieve , or battles they did not appear in. In the end they are impersonating for gain even if that gain is recognition. It still makes the dishonorable, and worthless.
     
  5. Ravi
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    Ravi Diamond Member

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    If he was trying to board a plane with a gun or impersonating an officer or serviceman to commit a crime I'd agree with you.

    It is dishonorable but not a crime what the guy in the OP did as far as I can see.
     
  6. George Costanza
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    George Costanza A Friendly Liberal

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    Unconstitutional on what basis? I would think you would want to know that before commenting adversely on the decision.

    OK - it would appear it is a First Amendment issue. This from the linked blog:

    I don't have much respect for someone who would do something like this, but I don't think it is a criminal act. This makes a lot of sense:

     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2010
  7. ConHog
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    ConHog BANNED

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    Don't we disallow lying in other instances? File a false police report, that's a crime. Perjury? Crime. Falsifying certain records? Crime, etc etc. So are all lies in all situations now permissible?
     
  8. Modbert
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    Modbert Daydream Believer Supporting Member

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    Except filing a false police report, perjury, and faking certain records intentionally are all intentional dishonest things.

    Legal Definition of Perjury

    I wouldn't want this to happen. These hero wannabes are scumbags and all that needs to be done is fixing of the Stolen Valor Act so the first amendment isn't hurt.
     
  9. Quantum Windbag
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    Quantum Windbag Gold Member

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    Which is what makes the Stolen Valor Act unconstitutional.
     
  10. Quantum Windbag
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    Quantum Windbag Gold Member

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    Really? There are legitimate concerns if someone claims to be an FBI agent at an airport, but someone claiming to be a vet cannot arrest anyone.
     

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