SpaceX Launches and Recovers Again

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by longknife, Sep 10, 2018.

  1. longknife
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    longknife Diamond Member

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    [​IMG]

    Not only launches but the first stage returns and lands on a ship designed for it!

    A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket successfully launched a communications satellite into orbit Monday before completing a drone ship landing in the Atlantic Ocean.

    Following a 77-minute weather delay, the Falcon 9 Rocket took off from Florida’s Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 12:45 a.m. EDT, and then sent the satellite into orbit 32 minutes later.

    About 8 minutes after the separation, the first stage of the Falcon 9 landed on a drone ship called “Of Course I Still Love You.”

    More w/video @ Watch SpaceX Launch Telstar 18 Vantage Satellite Into Orbit
     
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  2. miketx
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    miketx Diamond Member

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    That is so cool! No longer do we have let a million dollar piece of hardware get smashed in the ocean. Now, all they gotta do is figure out a means of propulsion that can eliminate dependence on rockets that can be used to achieve very high speeds in the solar system, thereby reducing travel time between planets from months and years to days or weeks.
     
  3. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Mike, we already know how to do this. But first we have to put into space manufacturing plants to build or assemble the rockets. Because they are not capable of launching out of our gravity well. The Falcon Heavy is a big step in that direction.
     
  4. miketx
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    miketx Diamond Member

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    What method of propulsion exists that will make interplanetary travel in days or weeks instead of months and years? I was not speaking of lifting away from the Earth. I understand the force needed to reach escape velocity. I only talking travel in space. A method of propulsion that does not involve coasting toward a spot where your planetary object will be when you get there.
     
  5. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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  6. ThunderKiss1965
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    ThunderKiss1965 Gold Member

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    Private industry doing it better and cheaper than the Big Government Bureaucracy.
     
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  7. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Without the early and costly research, Space X would not have the technology it has today. Only governments can afford investments when it will decades before there is a direct payback. So knocking the government's efforts in space is denial of their essential role is the starting of space development.
     
  8. ThunderKiss1965
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    ThunderKiss1965 Gold Member

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    Bullshit personal computers and automobiles are just two things off the top of my head that Government had very little to do with and yet private industry developed the technologies involved. In todays world private industry absolutely has the funds to develop tech without the feds intervention which is a good thing for the public. We don't need your bloated bureaucracies any more.
     
  9. Old Rocks
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    My goodness, another super stupid 'Conservative'. Oh surprise, surprise.

    It’s Not Just the Internet: How Government Built the Computer Industry

    This week, the Wall Street Journal‘s L. Gordon Crovitz wrote a strange column decrying the claim that the U.S. government created the internet as an “urban myth.” Crovitz was quickly debunked by myself and many others. The truth is even deeper. The U.S. high-technology industry, and the computer industry in particular, owe their existence to the government.

    [​IMG]
    A technician changes an ENIAC tube. (U.S. Army)
    The computer was a war baby. The U.S. Army and Navy, needing fast ways to solve the differential equations they needed to aim long-range guns, funded major research projects. The Army effort, at the University of Pennsylvania, yielded ENIAC. The top engineers on the project, J. Presper Eckert and John Mauchly started their own company (soon sold to Sperry Rand) which built the first “private” commercial computer, UNIVAC.

    In addition to being based on ENIAC, UNIVAC incorporated important advances from John von Neumann’s group at the Institute for Advanced Studies as well as work from Maurice Wilkes’ group at the University of Cambridge and Alan Turing’s cryptographic computing efforts at Bletchly Park. All of these efforts were funded by the U.S. and British governments. And the buyer of the first UNIVAC system: The U.S. Census Bureau.

    IBM’s work with the Navy was less groundbreaking, but the company moved into electronic computers in a big way after the war. A declassified history of computing at the National Security Agency shows just how deeply the NSA was involved in the design and development of IBM’s 700-series computers. NSA also paid for development of the first supercomputer, the IBM 7030 Stretch, in the late 1950s and its successor, HARVEST. It really wasn’t until the 1960s that commercial demand for computers eclipsed government purchases and the design of those business systems, such as the IBM 1401, 7090, and System/360, was heavily influenced by the work that had been done on government contracts.
     
  10. longknife
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    longknife Diamond Member

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    I took you off Ignore for this and was most pleased at your post. It was not only informative but put the errnousposter in his/her place in a civil manner.

    Thank you.
     

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