Space X Starship Preparing for Trials

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Weatherman2020, Sep 29, 2019.

  1. Weatherman2020
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    Weatherman2020 Diamond Member

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    Finally, signs we are in the 21st Century.
    First launch scheduled to launch from Texas before the end of the year.
    B58D8078-891B-46FE-9978-73FE7F12A84F.jpeg FE25D21B-E914-4A6D-BB20-DD955C2B5711.jpeg
     
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  2. Frannie
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    Frannie BANNED

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    There are no star ships...……………………..
     
  3. petro
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    petro Gold Member

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    Oh lighten up Francis.
    Its still pretty cool. They can call it whatever they want.
    Looks kinda like Flash Gordons rocket.
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    Should be called the Zarkov.
     
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  4. Frannie
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    Frannie BANNED

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    Starships go to stars, if this thing gets off the Earth the idiot owner will claim success
     
  5. sealybobo
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    sealybobo BANNED

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    CubeSats are small, only about twice the size of a Rubik's Cube. As the name suggests, they're cube-shaped, 4 inches on each side, and weigh in at about 3 pounds. But with the miniaturization of electronics, it's become possible to pack a sophisticated mission into a tiny package.

    But with the advent of smartphones, Goldberg says, engineers started getting really good at packing a bunch of electronics into a small space. CubeSats started getting more sophisticated, and the cost of electronics that could be used in space came down. Scientists started to take notice.

    Finding water would be a boon for future attempts to sustain human habitats on the moon. "It would be a resource for living off the land if we could find enough of it there," Cohen says.

    "We are using a solar sail as our primary propulsion system," says Tiffany Russell Lockett, an engineer NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. She's working on a CubeSat mission called NEA Scout that's heading for an asteroid.

    "A solar sail is large, thin-film reflective surface," Lockett says. "Think of like a sailboat or a large kite. But instead of using wind to propel itself, it uses sunlight."

    The sail is folded up for launch, a process done by hand that takes weeks. Unfurled, the sail is bigger than a highway billboard, completely dwarfing the tiny box it emerged from.

    Shkolnik studies the radiation environment around stars that have planets orbiting them. Understanding that environment will be crucial in determining whether exoplanets have atmospheres. To do that work, she needs to point a telescope at the stars for as long as possible. That's why she's working on a CubeSat called SPARCS, the Star-Planet Activity Research CubeSat.

    "This way if you build what you need for one very clear experiment, then you can have the full year to do one experiment really well," Shkolnik says.

    She thinks more scientists will be turning to miniature satellites in the future.
     
  6. Cosmos
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    Cosmos Diamond Member

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    I think there was a reason we launched a rocket with a gross weight of 6.2 million pounds to put a tiny lander with two people on the surface of the moon. To my knowledge physics hasn't changed much in the last 50 years. So I don't know wtf Musk will ever accomplish with this thing, but landing 100 people on the surface of the Moon or Mars isn't likely to be one of them.
     
  7. Mindful
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    Mindful Platinum Member

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    I thought that, after watching go for launch, we have lift off, in the "Apollo 13" movie.

    So much drops off that rocket, (and in the early stages) just to send the thing on the end of it hurtling into space.

    So much goes to waste,
     
  8. fncceo
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    fncceo Gold Member

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    That's the biggest aluminum xmas tree I've ever seen!
     
  9. Fort Fun Indiana
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    Fort Fun Indiana Platinum Member

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    "The ITS ship will sport nine Raptors and the 40-foot-wide (12 m) booster will boast a whopping 42, allowing the rocket to produce 13,033 tons of thrust at liftoff — 3.6 times more than NASA's Saturn V moon rocket was able to generate, Musk said." - SPACE.COM
     
  10. fncceo
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    fncceo Gold Member

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    The Space Race is over. Humans won't be back in space in a meaningful way for the foreseeable future. It's just too expensive with no return on investment.

    It will take a major shift in technology that drops the cost to a tenth of current levels to reignite human exploration or space.
     

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