Slow Bleed Plan Will Hurt Dems

Discussion in 'Middle East - General' started by red states rule, Feb 26, 2007.

  1. red states rule
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    red states rule Senior Member

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    One they came to power, all the things Dems promised they would do went out the window

    The time it took for Pelosi to waddle up and take the gavel, she "forgot" all the things Dems ran on

    The Dems do not have the guts to cut off funding, so they have to invent a way to do it without really doing it

    Much like the John Kerry way of doing things - I actually voted for the $87 billion before I voted against it



    Quandary in Iraq
    A 'slow bleed' strategy to stop the surge probably would backfire on the Democrats
    Sunday, February 25, 2007

    Many Democrats in Congress believe the war in Iraq is irretrievably lost, or that it would redound to their political advantage if it were lost. But they don't want to be blamed for the consequences of defeat.

    This has placed House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid in something of a quandary. The Constitution provides Congress with a means to end the war: Congress can cut off funding. But if Congress were to cut off money for the war in Iraq, and if all the bad things the intelligence community predicts would happen if we withdraw precipitously did happen, it would be pretty clear who was responsible for those bad things. And because it would be pretty clear who was responsible, many queasy Democrats in the House and Senate might not vote to cut off funds, giving the leadership an embarrassing defeat if it moved to do so.

    So the Democrats may adopt what's been called the "slow bleed" strategy. Rep. Jack Murtha, D-Johnstown, outlined it last week in an interview with the left wing Web site MoveCongress.org. The strategy would be to impose, through amendments to the defense appropriations bill, so many restrictions on U.S. troops that the president's plan for a surge would be hamstrung.

    There are, from the Democrats' perspective, two clever things about the "slow bleed" strategy. The first is that sabotaging the war effort in this way would not be nearly as clear cut as it would be by a vote to cut off funds, thus making it easier to evade blame for the consequences of defeat. The second is that if Congress passes a defense appropriations bill with these restrictions, President Bush would be left with three unpalatable choices: He could sign the bill and accept the restrictions, thus accepting slow defeat in Iraq. He could sign the bill and ignore the restrictions on the grounds that they are an unconstitutional trespass on his powers as commander in chief (which they would be), thus provoking a constitutional crisis. Or he could veto the bill, and thus risk defunding the war himself, should Congress not promptly pass a defense appropriations bill shorn of the restrictions.

    http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/07056/764552-373.stm
     

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