Sky: Open Invitation

Discussion in 'Religion and Ethics' started by emilynghiem, Mar 18, 2011.

  1. emilynghiem
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    emilynghiem Constitutionalist Supporting Member

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    Dear Sky: Sorry to post this as a direct msg to you. But I would like to extend an open invitation to you, as a dedicated Tibetan Buddhist, to come visit the Dawn Mountain temple in Houston. The founder is Dr. Anne Klein, the personal translator for the Dalai Lama who is credited for publishing the first English translations of many of the traditional prayers and texts. She brings him in on a semi-regular basis to give presentations in Houston, most are open to the public and some are addressed to specific issues, such as addressing the business community in Houston. I don't know how closely the Rinpoche's you follow and her group follows are connected, but I believe that would be closer to the practice of Buddhism you relate and are dedicated to. If you would like to join their mailing list to receive updates on calendar events, look online for DawnMountain.org. If there is a special event in the future you would like to attend in Houston, I am happy to help chip in for your airfare or make arrangements so that can happen for you. Since you volunteer in counseling, that is like my way of contributing to your outreach work. If you do come to Houston I would love to meet you, and introduce you to my friends with similar outreach work. Whatever ways work for different people, I believe we should have knowledge of these varieties so we can refer to different people who need these different approaches. I would not want any soul to suffer for lack of access to the group or person that could support them in their steps of spiritual progress and healing. So I would rather each person be connected and networked in with all the available resources that could help them. If this sounds like something you would like to explore, please let me know. My email is emilynghiem at hotmail or you can contact Dawn Mountain and become a member of the email list to receive information directly. Some of the past presentations include bringing to Houston the Tibetan nuns who sing the ancient prayers of the Tara, and a film showing of the Life of the Buddha from PBS at the Houston Museum of Fine Arts. They also brought the Dalai Lama to speak at Rice University (where Dr. Klein is Chair of the Religious Studies) two times since I lived in Houston (with a 3rd engagement cancelled due to hurricane emergencies, even though Pastor Joel Olsteen at Lakewood Church had offered to reschedule at his building to accommodate the event and the large audience.)

    I believe you would probably relate to Dr. Anne's teachings and presentations she gives that are more traditional to Tibetan Buddhism, as she has studied the language herself to be fluent in order to adhere to the original meaning and to translate into English.

    So I offer this to you, in support of your practice, that you may better realize the purposes you seek through that.

    Thank you Sky
    I hope I do get to meet you someday!

    To help you to come to Houston if that would help you to support and develop your practice would be an honor. I think you would really like Dr. Anne and how she teaches and explains these things. As a religious studies professor, she is adept at distinguishing the Buddhist from the Christian and other traditions, but without any conflict just pure harmony and wisdom. She works closely with many other ministers and religious leaders, so I think you would find assurance and comfort in that approach. She and others worked with the Dalai Lama to set up a center for religious tolerance at Rice, and the speakers there are just wonderful. All coming from positions that respect Christianity and Buddhism, without compromising either one, while also making distinctions between how they teach things. I align more with Thich Nhat Hanh's "engaged Buddhism" that is how Buddhism applies to American culture more specifically. I recognize that you prefer the Tibetan Buddhism so I would want you to have access to more resources and contacts with that realm of practice and study. If I can help you in any way, I am glad. Please let me know!

    Yours truly,
    Emily

    emilynghiem at hotmail or yahoo.com
     
  2. Sky Dancer
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    Sky Dancer BANNED

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    My wife is a student of Anne Klein.
     
  3. emilynghiem
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    emilynghiem Constitutionalist Supporting Member

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    Isn't that wonderful? To know we are connected so closely in the Sangha.
    Do you follow the same teachings or Rinpoche?
    May I ask how your wife refers to you?
    I apologize if I made references that were not consistent with your relationship.

    Here is the link to the PBS film on the Life of the Buddha
    I attended with my Mom. One of the few movies I could take my mother to!
    And we actually agreed on this one:

    http://tvshack.cc/movies/The_Buddha__2010_/

    Did you like this one, Sky? I liked how it addressed both the history and basic teachings, as well as including the "symbolic mythology" that sprung around Buddha, but without taking this "literally" where it detracts from the real message and application to daily life.

    (My other friend who follows the Buddhist concepts but not the religious traditions
    likes this presentation also. But my friend in NY who is more Japanese Buddhist, and training to be a priest in a very religious setting, did not think this film was fair in leaving out the other traditions of Buddhist practice, but only focusing on the most popular.)

    Normally my mother is more traditionalist and does not follow my broader "universalist" understanding of the teachings in Buddhism. But the more specific you get to culture, her ways are not universal to all people when you limit the language and sharing that way. Everyone has his or her own path to discover and follow.

    I find the parts that are universal to all forms of practicing Buddhism
    are also universal to all faiths or ways (including nonreligious or nontheist as well as theist or religious). So those universal concepts are the parts that I follow.

    The rest I leave to individual preference as to how they are called to apply their own practice. The variations I try not to haggle about, because each person may relate differently. I find if you stick to the basic concepts that are central to all, that applies to anyone in any situation, as practical wisdom about living in spiritual harmony in the world.
     
  4. Sky Dancer
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    Sky Dancer BANNED

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    Anne Klein has stayed at our house for dharma events. We have sponsored her and Rinpoche. My wife refers to me as 'honey', or 'boo'. I introduce her as my wife, partner or best friend depending on the context.

    I am a student of Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche and his lineage lamas including Lama Drimed.
     
  5. emilynghiem
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    emilynghiem Constitutionalist Supporting Member

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    I don't know if this means the world is small, or it is big to include everyone we know!

    Funny, I call my boyfriend boo sometimes but he hates that. boo-boo is even worse!

    He and I disagree on gay marriage.

    I would say that to be constitutionally fair, either include all ways or get marriage out from under the state and only have civil unions and civil contracts for everyone. Keep marriage in the private religious or spiritual realm and choice of institutions that govt cannot regulate or impose policy on. If people agree, then it is okay for laws of the state to reflect or agree with laws that are also religious or spiritual, such as laws against murder.
    But where people disagree, I believe consensus is required before a law can be passed that is considered constitutional and equally protecting and representing public interest.

    So we debate a lot. He is neither into Buddhism or Christianity but we agree on most issues of Constitutional principle. Everyone has some areas that we believe there should be laws or no laws. He believes in legalizing prostitution but not drugs. He does not believe in banning either guns or abortion, but some people would ban one and not the other. So everyone has their preferences and differences.

    BTW Sky when you said Buddhists and Christians have nothing in common and should remain separate, what about Buddhists or Christians who both believe in tolerance and not condemning homosexuality, and certainly not passing laws with biased bans?

    If Buddhists and Christians share that purpose in common, would you oppose them working together to educate people and enforce policies that are free of religious bias and more tolerant of different interests equally protected under law?
     
  6. Sky Dancer
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    Sky Dancer BANNED

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    I talked to my wife tonight and told her I hate Christians. She started to laugh and said no you don't. You only hate some of them. She's known me for 26 years.

    Posters here don't even know my real name, yet they think they know me better than my wife.

    Buddhists and Christians have nothing in common spiritually. Of course, all human beings are interdependent. If I were to boycott all Christian businesses I would likely be in bad shape. They own the US.

    I'm very much in favor of tolerance. I support the Teaching Tolerance Program.

    For the purposes of the religion forum, I think I'm done with posting. It should be renamed the Christian forum. It's for Christians only. Let the Christians have this forum.

    I'll be around. If there's a thread you'd like me to comment on, PM me and let me know.

    Later,

    Sky
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2011
  7. chesswarsnow
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    chesswarsnow "SASQUATCH IS WATCHING"

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    Sorry bout that,


    1. Ashamed?:confused:


    Regards,
    SirJamesofTexas
     
  8. emilynghiem
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    emilynghiem Constitutionalist Supporting Member

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    Hi Sky you are welcome to come post on backpage.com where the nontheists or "anti-theists" seem to roar the loudest and get the last word. They would gladly welcome anyone who is against Christians or theists in general to come join the team!

    I think it is one of life's ironies that you pick Buddhism to temper yourself,
    admitting you hold hatred/resentment toward Christians while also supporting the "teaching of tolerance." Clearly you see what a challenge it is, as asking a Christian to be tolerant and accepting of Buddhists would be as difficult to some people as asking you to tolerate Christian dominance! So this is just a humbling reminder how hard that can be.

    The dichotomy that you present is, in itself, a challenge to include and respect this path.
    I have a friend who is anarchist yet supports the U.S. military and believes it is necessary.
    I have a friend who is atheist yet teaches the gift of forgiveness as
    "the abundance of free grace" and encourages others to take full advantage of this!
    So you present a unique challenge also, an irony or paradox, that is a sign of something greater going on in the universe than anyone has the right to judge as possible or preferable, right or wrong, it just is. That is the way you are and where you are right now.

    The above statement you make is just divinely ironic,
    that you hate Christians but support the teaching of tolerance!

    Thank you for your honesty which is refreshing.
    For someone to have no qualms at all in stating precisely what you feel,
    regardless if it seems contrary or not, that is what it is.

    I also wanted to ask you, since this has helped me in the past communicate over the internet, if you identify more as male or female. One friend I met over the internet did not respond to me at all, but shut me out, until I spoke to "him" as a "her" so I could reach the real person inside and not just the front "he" had put on to please society! His real personality came out when I talked to her just like I would to a female friend.

    Are you more comfortable talking from a male voice/side or a female side?
    I find this makes a difference with some people, who are sensitive that way,
    so that is why I ask. Would it help to feel less defensive of your views if I addressed a different side of you that is trying to express how you feel?

    Do you have a special Buddhist name that you were given?
    I'd like to speak to the real you inside, if these outward appearances are what causes such resentment against Christian dominance and influence.

    I believe everyone has some masculine and feminine energy to their spirit, so if you feel more comfortable talking from a male viewpoint, I am willing to work on that level if that is more you. Please let me know where you feel the most natural and at peace where there is less need to defend or attack to justify your position but you speak for yourself, not in reaction to the world around you.

    I'm beginning to think it is the male side of you that is so offended by Christian dominance that is the side of people that gets territorial and barks and marks boundaries to keep out unwanted influences. Could it be that side is trying to be protective?

    Thanks, Sky
    Yours truly,
    Emily

    P.S. I like how you said it on another post, that "humanity" is the one thing that Buddhism and Christianity may have in common.

    I believe if we DID focus on what is better for "humanity's sake" that would lead to the same conclusions and decisions on either path, to avoid that which causes suffering/separation/sin (negative consequences, however you describe them) and to choose to receive that which allows healing, grace, spiritual peace, freedom in truth/wisdom, compassion/charity (positive consequences, however you describe them).

    So Sky I do agree that even if that is all that is shared in common, focusing on "humanity" is sufficient. You make a good point.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2011
  9. Sky Dancer
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    Less analysis, more question and answer.

    Truth is I don't hate ALL Christians. I hate the Scott Lively and Martin Ssempa's of the world and all those who give them a pass.

    Here's how a Buddhist works with anger and hatred. We sit with it.
     

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