Saudi-Turkey Relations Set for New Era

Discussion in 'Middle East - General' started by ekrem, Aug 7, 2006.

  1. ekrem
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    ekrem VIP Member

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    ANKARA, 8 August 2006 — Saudi Arabia and Turkey are all set to enter into a new era of political and economic relations with the historic three-day visit of Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Abdullah to Ankara, beginning today.

    “The secular character of Turkey will not be an obstacle on the way of forming a strategic partnership between Riyadh and Ankara,” said Foreign Minister Prince Saud Al-Faisal.

    Ankara is preparing to roll out the red carpet for the king and his entourage. Turkish officials were busy the whole day making elaborate arrangements for the royal visit.

    Turkish International Trade Minister Kursad Tuzmen told Arab News yesterday that the focus of the visit is to strengthen international ties with seven agreements lined up to be signed during this visit.

    The visit will be the first by a Saudi king in 40 years and is expected to open a new chapter in bilateral relations, Prince Saud said in statements published yesterday.

    The prince said the accession of Turkey to the European Union would help the West have a better understanding of the Islamic world and contribute to resolving many issues.

    “I believe that Saudi Arabia and Turkey can play a joint role at regional and international levels to reinforce world peace and stability.”
    Saud said both sides have the will to strengthen political, economic and military ties.[/b]
    (...)
    (...)
    http://www.arabnews.com/?page=1&section=0&article=85090&d=8&m=8&y=2006

    7 Agreements will be made. One of them militarily.
    And Saudi-Arabian Foreign ministry speaks of "strategic partnership".
     
  2. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    From what I can gather, sounds like a match.
     
  3. ekrem
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    ekrem VIP Member

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    With Saudi-Arabia we have a big fish on our fishing rod. And Saudis will invest heavily in Turkey, as United Arab Emirates is doing actualy with Prince Al-Maktoum. That Prince who wanted to manage US ports.
    Also Lebanon, where Arab investors were strong present is bombed to stone-age and they will come to Turkey.
    And Turkey will export many goods to Saudi-Arabia and our regional leading construction firms will take yearly billions of construction orders.

    But this is all economy-related.
    The security-policy related thing is, that Turkey and Saudi-Arabia will exchange views on regional implications.
    Such as Iraq-War and possible plans of USA to divide Iraq, and a possible Nuclear Iran.

    With all the money they have got in USA and their barrel production they are lobbyist in Israel-category.
    When we think of such maps like that of Ralph Peters, who draw Kamikaze-fictionally a divided Saudi-Arabia whose divided parts will be joined with Iraq-Schiite-Arabs, and when we think, that Saudi-Arabia have 15% Shiites in Saudi-Arabia themself then a civil war by a divided Iraq may swap to Saudi-Arabia.

    We, as Turks, actually might not agree with Saudis in their religious depth and understanding and interpretation of Islam, but our concerns for the region match 1 on 1. Same with Iran regarding Iraq.
    So Turkey is makeing strategy with every important Iraq-Neigbour regarding Iraq strategy. And this will benefit Turkey multi-facetted from economy to security-related things.

    And to Kathianne:
    You sell Saudi-Arabia Abrahams, invite them to Camp David, Bush is hand in hand photograhed with King Abdulah in world press.
    Why should Turkey not? We are not establishing any visa-agreements where Saudis will live in Turkey. It is all Security, Military and Economy related.
     
  4. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Like I said Canavar, seems like a match. My views of US-SA ties are on record.
     
  5. onedomino
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    onedomino SCE to AUX

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    So when can we actually expect these anti-American countries to actually "reinforce world peace?" Err...is this before or after the Saudis send money to Hamas? Is this before or after the Turks prevented the 4th ID from invading northern Iraq? The only thing we can depend on these countries for is that they will act in their own self interest.
     
  6. ekrem
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    ekrem VIP Member

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    Yes it is indeed a match.
    The intrduction article says, that a Saudi-prince comes to Turkey after 40 years.
    But the truth is, that the last visit was not a State visit, but Saudi king attended a multi-state conference in Istanbul.

    This visit is the first visit in the history of both states.
    You have to question why it comes now and not 10 years before or 10 years later.
    Our region is like a detailled clockwork. When USA like Iraq-adventure moves on some gears of this clockwork, it will affect the other gears automatically move them.

    Saudi-Arabia is not a military power but they are an oil power, on which everybody in this world is dependent. With yearly budget-surplus of billions, billions, billions of Dollars.
    Going into realationship with such a state, on the one side hearing what they have to say to us and on the other side what we have to tell them, is a regional cooperation which was not there before.

    If this will be a strategic partnership, like Saudi-Foregn minister says i can not predict from here. Possibly it will be not, but it shows that Saudi wants deeper relations with Turkey.
    And when Saudis come with money and coresponding security related views then they are welcomed.

    In current situation in the MIddle East we will not shut the door in front of the Saudi Nose. President Bush and every other statesmen in this world isn't either.
     
  7. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Yup, which is their right. The Saudis have been playing this for a long time. That Turkey wishes to get involved now seems to mean they wish to throw off the EU deal, which grant you, will be welcomed by the French.
     
  8. ekrem
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    ekrem VIP Member

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    Haveing cooperation with Saudis is not a crime.
    Saudi Kings toured Camp David to Versailles.

    The logic, that Turkey will not come to EU because they establish relations and cooperation with Saudis is the same logic, that France must cancel relationships with Saudi-Arabia.

    EU has nothing to do with this and EU isn't authorized to command Turkey with whom Turkey has to establish relations.
    Turkish-EU negotiation chapters are 34 in number and pre-defined. 28 of them economy-related like Environment standards, which grade of curve a cucumber has to be ans such bureacratic things.

    Turkey's southern boarders is Middle East, where the energy will come to Europe through Turkey and Turkey will ensure EU a role in politics of Midle East besides being a paper tiger.
    And many positions of Turkey, like Lebanon, Iran, Iraq are corresponding even now with EU.

    So EU has nothing to do with King Abdullah visit. It is Turkish business.
     
  9. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Ok, see what happens. You are very right, it is Turkish business. Just like at the borders.
     
  10. ekrem
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    ekrem VIP Member

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    You have to see it all in a strategic view and what is going on in the middle east.


    Will Turkey Get Closer?


    King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz starts a historic three-day visit to Turkey, the first by a Saudi monarch since King Faisal visited Istanbul in 1974. The visit has been scheduled for some time and previously postponed. It comes at a time when Israeli aggression in Lebanon is at the center of events, let alone the situation in Iraq.

    Of course, economic concerns will be on the negotiation table, since the economy is of great importance to both countries, even if it always disappears under the weight of incessant political developments in the region. Bilateral relations will also be discussed at length; this is how the Saudis like to portray the visit, without delving into anymore details!

    Reality in Iraq, Lebanon, Palestine and Syria, where Iran is now the most prominent player, indicates Iran’s hijacking of Arab issues transforming them into a deck of cards, something that can no longer be ignored. Riyadh is well aware of what Tehran is doing and information suggests that the Saudi authorities have repeatedly and candidly spoken to the Iranians telling them that they do not have free reign to act as they will, however, Iran does not tire of implementing what it wants, despite all the promises it had made.

    In a press conference, two days ago, Ali Larjani, Iran’s national security chief, said Iran rejects the French-US draft UN resolution on Lebanon. The implication of Lebanon’s rejection and the statements by parliamentary speaker Nabih Berri are also understood, but what does Tehran have to do with all this?

    Regarding Iraq, at least Iran shares a border with the country. But, what about Lebanon, taking into account that the Iranian Foreign Minister visited Lebanon through Damascus, without the knowledge of the Lebanese government, preceding the meeting of Arab Foreign Ministers.

    The value of the summit in Turkey now becomes evident. It is an important regional power, a member of NATO and is on the doorstep of the European Union. Saudi Arabia has an evident international and regional role, one we currently perceive in Lebanon, Palestine and Iraq. Reality tells us that Turkey is, under the current circumstances, a better guarantor of Iraq’s unity then that of the Arabs, whose stances and interests remain, divided.

    This is why Turkey will undoubtedly grow closer to the region, in order to balance the scales… Ankara which was distorted by the reformist camp for a long time, under the pretext of secularism, despite the secularism in Iraq under Saddam Hussein and in Syria, is now important after the fall of Saddam and the increasing Iranian influence.

    History tells us the ambitions of the Safavi dynasty, which converted Iran to Shiaa Islam, and sought to convert others, was hindered by the Ottoman Empire. It seems history will repeat itself and Iran’s political ambitions and those of its agents in the region will be thwarted, especially as the Americans appear to be, more than ever before, ready to withdraw from an ailing Iraq, with whom Iran has a long history. Will the Saudis do so? Will Turkey get closer? These questions await answers.

    http://aawsat.com/english/news.asp?section=2&id=5917

    P.S: the commentary is from the chief-editor of an arab newspaper, not turkish.
     

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