Sanders just submitted college for all bill.

Discussion in 'Congress' started by Penelope, Oct 18, 2015.

  1. Penelope
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    Penelope Gold Member

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    Summary of Sen. Sanders’ College for All Act


    Eliminate Undergraduate Tuition at 4-year Public Colleges and Universities. This legislation

    would provide $47 billion per year to states to eliminate undergraduate tuition and fees at public

    colleges and universities.

    Today, total tuition at public colleges and universities amounts to about $70 billion per year. Under

    the College for All Act, the federal government would cover 67% of this cost, while the states would

    be responsible for the remaining 33% of the cost. (then above it says states get 47 billion a year, so why not have the fed gov to pay the cost)


    To qualify for federal funding, states must meet a number of requirements designed to protect

    students, ensure quality, and reduce ballooning costs. States will need to maintain spending on their

    higher education systems, on academic instruction, and on need-based financial aid. In addition,

    colleges and universities must reduce their reliance on low-paid adjunct faculty.

    States would be able to use funding to increase academic opportunities for students, hire new faculty,

    and provide professional development opportunities for professors.


    No funding under this program may be used to fund administrator salaries, merit-based fina

    4

    http://www.sanders.senate.gov/download/collegeforallsummary/?inline=filencial aid,

    For one thing I do not think colleges should keep raising rates as they are, needs to be a ban placed on the costs, so much of the classroom is done via Skype and well at home on personal computers. I do not believe in tenure either.

    also anything free, is well taken for granted.

    also a lot of our property tax goes to public schools, the two year college we have and also the 4 year university we have in our county, mileage increases.

    Most can't afford higher property taxes, sales tax hikes or state income tax raises, so this is going to affect everyone is it not?

    When I went to college, awhile ago, the special interest rate was 9,9% interest on student loans. I'm don't want to go back to that, and I do think college should be affordable to all, but not on the tax payers back.

    I'm not understanding this I guess.
     
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  2. Conservative65
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    Conservative65 BANNED

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    How do you propose making college affordable for all? The only proposals I seem to hear form the left involves doing so by making someone else pay for what parents aren't doing.
     
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  3. Arianrhod
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    Arianrhod Gold Member

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    Apparently some people see the word "tax" and their brains shut down.

    Here's a one-page summary of the proposal:

    http://www.sanders.senate.gov/download/collegeforallsummary/?inline=file

    Let me quote the only part that's apparently of concern (no one here has college-age kids?):

    Fully Paid for by Imposing a Robin Hood Tax on Wall Street.
    This legislation is offset by imposing a Wall Street speculation fee on investment houses, hedge fund
    s, and other speculators of 0.5% on stock trades (50 cents for every $100 worth of stock), a 0.1% fee
    on bonds, and a 0.005% fee on derivatives. It has been estimated that this provision could
    raise hundreds of billions a year which could be used not only to make tuition free at public colleges
    and universities in this country, it could also be used to create millions of jobs and rebuild the
    middle class of this country.

    I'll be happy to break it down further if anyone's interested but, bottom line, unless you're a hedge fund manager (and a bad one), you've got nothing to worry about.
     
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  4. Penelope
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    Penelope Gold Member

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    Apparently some states are going to depend on lottery money, gambling, I'm not, free anything is not appreciated, esp. Times have changed, we use to have part time jobs to help us get through college, which some rich kids just partied their 4 years away. I have read that only a portion of our lotto money for schools is going towards schools, which was suppose to all go towards schools, but we have a full time government, why I do not know.


    On Tuesday, Tennessee lawmakers passed a bill that will make tuition free for all high school graduates who go to a two-year college. It now heads to Gov. Bill Haslam (R)’s desk, who has made it a signature part of his campaign to improve the state’s graduation rates from 32 percent to 55 percent by 2025.

    Beyond graduating from high school, students who participate in the Tennessee Promise program will have to maintain a 2.0 grade point average, attend mandatory meetings, work with a mentor, and do community service. After they graduate two-year colleges, they can enroll in a four-year school as juniors.

    The program, which is expected to cost about $34 million a year, will be paid for using $300 million in excess lottery reserve funds and by creating a $47 million endowment. The bill also lowers the state’s current scholarship for four-year colleges, which is funded with lottery money, from $4,000 to $3,500 for freshmen and sophomores, although it will increase to $4,500 for juniors and seniors.

    Tennessee will be the first state to offer free college tuition, although Florida, Mississippi, and Oregon are considering similar plans. Others have looked at so-called “pay it forward” plans that allow students to attend community colleges or public universities at no cost but require them to pay a certain portion of their income after graduation — one model would have community college students pay 1.5 percent of their incomes for 20 years after graduation.

    But the federal government could go even further than any of these states. For the amount that it already spends on subsidizing the cost of college through grants, tax breaks, and work-study funds — or about $69 billion — it could instead make tuition at all public colleges free for about $63 billion. (The government spends another $107.4 billion on student loans, given it even more funds to use for this purpose.) While not everyone would attend a public university, it would incentivize private ones to lower costs in order to compete with the free option.

    This State Will Offer Free College Tuition To High School Graduates
     
  5. Arianrhod
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    Arianrhod Gold Member

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    ^Good on Tennessee! Only for two-year colleges (the Sanders proposal is for four-year state colleges), but it's a start. :)
     
  6. Penelope
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    Penelope Gold Member

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    Yes that if his presidential plan, the other one I listed is an act he just put in. Your going to need a full Dem congress to get the above approved. I do think its not a bad idea to put a little gov tax on stocks.
     
  7. Billy_Kinetta
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    Billy_Kinetta Paladin of the Lost Hour Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Nothing involving cost is free. Someone pays for it.
     
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  8. Penelope
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    Penelope Gold Member

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    Ca use to , not sure if they do anymore. I think not due to money shortage.
     
  9. Manonthestreet
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    Manonthestreet Platinum Member Supporting Member

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    So states get stuck with another Fed mandate they dont have in their budget great plan.......and just another item to keep the printing press running devaluing your money further
     
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  10. Penelope
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    Penelope Gold Member

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    It looks like that, everyone is going to pay, even the 70 year old couple living next door when they themselves put their children through college. They should be exempt from increases , if they live below a certain wage, because they don't have lots of savings due to the fact they helped put their kids through college.
     

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