Sahel

Discussion in 'Middle East - General' started by Superlative, Jun 3, 2007.

  1. Superlative
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    Superlative Senior Member

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    PERHAPS no fact is more revealing about Iraq’s history than this: The Iraqis have a word that means to utterly defeat and humiliate someone by dragging his corpse through the streets.

    The word is “sahel,” and it helps explain much of what I have seen in three and a half years of covering the war.

    It is a word unique to Iraq, my friend Razzaq explained over tea one afternoon on my final tour. Throughout Iraq’s history, he said, power has changed hands only through extreme violence, when a leader was vanquished absolutely, and his destruction was put on display for all to see.

    Most famously it happened to a former prime minister, Nuri al-Said, who tried to flee after a military coup in 1958 by scurrying through eastern Baghdad dressed as a woman. He was shot dead. His body was disinterred and hacked apart, the bits dragged through the streets. In later years, Saddam Hussein and the Baath Party crushed their enemies with the same brand of brutality.

    “Other Arabs say, ‘You are the country of sahel,’ ” Razzaq said. “It has always been that way in Iraq.”

    But in this war, the moment of sahel has been elusive. No faction — not the Shiite Arabs or Sunni Arabs or Kurds — has been able to secure absolute power, and that has only sharpened the hunger for it.

    Listen to Iraqis engaged in the fight, and you realize they are far from exhausted by the war. Many say this is only the beginning.

    President Bush, on the other hand, has escalated the American military involvement here on the assumption that the Iraqi factions have tired of armed conflict and are ready to reach a grand accord. Certainly there are Iraqis who have grown weary. But they are not the ones at the country’s helm; many are among some two million who have fled, helping leave the way open for extremists to take control of their homeland.

    “We’ve changed nothing,” said Fakhri al-Qaisi, a Sunni Arab dentist turned hard-line politician who has three bullets lodged in his torso from a recent assassination attempt. “It’s dark. There will be more blood.”..............

    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/03/weekinreview/03wong.html?ref=world
     
  2. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    And that is what many of the milbloggers contend also. They however believe we need to use controlled violence to get the point across. Can't see that happening though.
     
  3. Superlative
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    Superlative Senior Member

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    It is doubtful.

    But if the US can get someone in power that is sympathetic to the "needs" of the US, and can rule as "necessary" to provide stability, I think everyone will be able to look the other way.
     
  4. Truthmatters
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    Not understanding this country has been the trademark of this admin.

    When they used the word crusade I think it was clear to all just how lacking their educations were.
     
  5. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    That is not clear. What do you mean? What would they be 'looking the other way at?'
     
  6. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Wrong, if they'd had the balls to stick with Crusade and mean it, things would be different. It's the West that fails to recognize the aggressors are religious based.
     
  7. Truthmatters
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    I thought we were saving Iraq from Sadam not taking for our own use?
     
  8. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    That would be al queda, sorry you failed to get the point. Probably clear to everyone but you.
     
  9. Truthmatters
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    so we didnt dispose Sadam?

    We didnt go because of WMDs?

    We went for the AQ ties which did not exsist?

    You see using the word crusade doesnt just insult AQ.
     
  10. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Two different fronts. Now you threw in Plame and what have you. One would have to surmise after reading all your posts, that it's because you really haven't a grip on what's going on.

    Truly, you are mixing oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes. Not to mention apples.
     

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