Russia flies first Su-57 fitted with new Product 30 engine

Discussion in 'Military' started by Daryl Hunt, Dec 6, 2017.

  1. Daryl Hunt
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    Daryl Hunt Gold Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    VIDEO: Russia flies first Su-57 fitted with new Product 30 engine

    Russia’s latest fighter aircraft flew on 5 December for the first time with the NPO Saturn “Product 30” engine, which will be the production standard for the Sukhoi Su-57.

    Sukhoi has built and flown nine flight test prototypes of the Su-57 fighter powered by NPO Saturn Product 117 engines, which are derived from the AL-41F-1S afterburning turbofans developed for the Su-35.

     
  2. JGalt
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    JGalt Platinum Member

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    Cool. They'll make a bigger explosion when we hit them with an air to air missile.
     
  3. JakeStarkey
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    JakeStarkey Diamond Member Supporting Member

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    Just bigger targets for American top guns.
     
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  4. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Interesting. The two engines were shown with dissimilar power settings. I wonder if one was spooled down to test single engine performance?
     
  5. JGalt
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    JGalt Platinum Member

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    That was one lucky pilot. It's a wonder the crate didn't crash and burn with the dissimilar engines pushing on the air frame like that.
     
  6. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Why? It appears the engines were run that way for the entire flight. I don't know if both were running but one was the new engine, while the other was an old engine being kept on as a backup, or one was spooled down for the test, either way it is an impressive aircraft. Not as good as our F-22 for sure, but they are getting there with help from the obummer admin.
     
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  7. Daryl Hunt
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    Daryl Hunt Gold Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Worstball, give it a break. Obama has nothing to do with this. The Russians are using their own home grown. Yes 20 years later. Which is about right. They are constantly behind about 20 years. But they do make a leap once in awhile. This is one of them. Their new engine hasn't really been rung out yet hence the old and the new engine. I will admit it appears odd but it is perfectly safe.

    As for worrying the F-22, not even on a good day. It's still going to be picked up on radar first with it's .25 stealth rating from the front and .5 from the other angles. The F-22 is rated at .00001 in all angles. And the F-35 is rated close to the F-22. The F-15 with just AA missiles is rated at .25 from all angles. The SU-35 is rated at .5 as is all of the SU-27 variants from all angles.

    I don't have the information of the F-15E with conformal fuel tanks with internal weapons bays since they are extremely hush hush on that one and if it can super cruise or not. I imagine with the existing engines, it probably can since it's one of the most powerful Fighters and is one clean puppy.

    This means that the Russians may have a true stealth bird in a few years, maybe 2030.
     
  8. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    The SU is a Gen 4+ fighter. That is pretty clear. The F-22 is a Gen 5. I have no idea where you get the radar cross section estimate but I think it is a tad on the conservative side. But, we truly won't know till we can get in the same airspace as one.
     
  9. Daryl Hunt
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    Daryl Hunt Gold Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    I can't remember where I got those figures. But I think they are pretty accurate. A 100% rating would be a barn door flying sideways. Everything is below that including a friggin brick. Even before the F-15 received it's AESA radar, it would still become aware of the SU-27 before the SU-27 became aware of the F-15. I think this is from the really clean lines of the F-15 and the reduced surfaces. Yes, Stealth was not designed in on the F-15, it was done more by luck.

    The SU-57 does have better lines from the front than it's predecessor but that's about it. It has longer ranged missiles than the F-15 but if you can't see your adversary until after he has fired then the longer range is worthless.

    About the most worthless thing on the SU-57 is the thrust vectoring. Even the F-22 at combat speeds gets little from it's vectoring thrust. Unless you want to turn off your G sensors. Then it can turn your brains into mush quickly.
     
  10. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    I know how radar cross sections are calculated, as I said, until we have something in the air with one we won't have any real idea what it's radar cross section will be. I find the engine upgrades to be pretty damned remarkable. They lowered the overall weight of the powerplant by 150 kg when a 1 kg drop is hard. The High-Pressure Turbine can reportedly operate without cooling blades or bearings, and no lubrication. You heard anything about that? Evidently they are using new ceramics in all sorts of areas of the engine.
     

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