Ruh Roh The warmers are losing teh Royal Society!

Discussion in 'Environment' started by westwall, May 28, 2010.

  1. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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  2. Oddball
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    Any truth to the rumor that the guy "investigating" CRU has a wee bit of a conflict of interest?
     
  3. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    No rumor at all Dude. 'Tis a fact that the Lord has a very large investment in the carbon trading markets.
     
  4. Oddball
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    Have a link to that one?

    I can't find the story anywhere.
     
  5. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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  6. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Must re-read statement from UK’s Royal Society and Met Office on the connection between global warming and extreme weather Climate Progress

    Summary
    The 2007 IPCC Assessment, the most comprehensive and respected analysis of climate change to date, states clearly that without substantial global reductions of greenhouse gas emissions we can likely expect a world of increasing droughts, floods and species loss, of rising seas and displaced human populations. However even since the 2007 IPCC Assessment the evidence for dangerous, long-term and potentially irreversible climate change has strengthened. The scientific evidence which underpins calls for action at Copenhagen is very strong. Without co-ordinated international action on greenhouse gas emissions, the impacts on climate and civilisation could be severe.

    Professor Julia Slingo, Chief Scientist, Met Office
    Professor Alan Thorpe, Chief Executive, NERC
    Lord Rees, President, the Royal Society
     
  7. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Global warming in the public sphere ? Philosophical Transactions A

    Global warming in the public sphere
    Jan Corfee-Morlot1*†, Mark Maslin1 and Jacquelin Burgess2
    + Author Affiliations

    1Geography Department, University College London Pearson Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    2School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK
    Author for correspondence (jan.corfee-morlot@oecd.org)
    Abstract
    Although the science of global warming has been in place for several decades if not more, only in the last decade and a half has the issue moved clearly into the public sphere as a public policy issue and a political priority. To understand how and why this has occurred, it is essential to consider the history of the scientific theory of the greenhouse effect, the evidence that supports it and the mechanisms through which science interacts with lay publics and other elite actors, such as politicians, policymakers and business decision makers. This article reviews why and how climate change has moved from the bottom to the top of the international political agenda. It traces the scientific discovery of global warming, political and institutional developments to manage it as well as other socially mediated pathways for understanding and promoting global warming as an issue in the public sphere. The article also places this historical overview of global warming as a public issue into a conceptual framework for understanding relationships between society and nature with emphasis on the co-construction of knowledge.
     
  8. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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  9. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Statement of the 11 National Academies of Science, including the US, Canada, and China

    http://www.nationalacademies.org/onpi/06072005.pdf

    Climate change is real
    There will always be uncertainty in understanding a system
    as complex as the world’s climate. However there is now
    strong evidence that significant global warming is
    occurring1. The evidence comes from direct measurements
    of rising surface air temperatures and subsurface ocean
    temperatures and from phenomena such as increases in
    average global sea levels, retreating glaciers, and changes
    to many physical and biological systems. It is likely that
    most of the warming in recent decades can be attributed
    to human activities (IPCC 2001)2. This warming has already
    led to changes in the Earth's climate.
    The existence of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is
    vital to life on Earth – in their absence average
    temperatures would be about 30 centigrade degrees lower
    than they are today. But human activities are now causing
    atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases –
    including carbon dioxide, methane, tropospheric ozone,
    and nitrous oxide – to rise well above pre-industrial levels.
    Carbon dioxide levels have increased from 280 ppm in
    1750 to over 375 ppm today – higher than any previous
    levels that can be reliably measured (i.e. in the last 420,000
    years). Increasing greenhouse gases are causing
    temperatures to rise; the Earth’s surface warmed by
    approximately 0.6 centigrade degrees over the twentieth
    century. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
    (IPCC) projected that the average global surface
    temperatures will continue to increase to between 1.4
    centigrade degrees and 5.8 centigrade degrees above 1990
    levels, by 2100.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2010
  10. Old Rocks
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    http://royalsociety.org/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=5591

    Our scientific understanding of climate change is sufficiently sound to make us highly confident that
    greenhouse gas emissions are causing global warming. Science moves forward by challenge and debate
    and this will continue. However, none of the current criticisms of climate science, nor the alternative
    explanations of global warming are well enough founded to make not taking any action the wise choice.
    The science clearly points to the need for nations to take urgent steps to cut greenhouse gas emissions
    into the atmosphere, as much and as fast as possible, to reduce the more severe aspects of climate
    change. We must also prepare for the impacts of climate change, some of which are already inevitable.
    This document was compiled with the help of the Royal Society Climate Change Advisory Group and
    other leading experts.
     

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