Rising Sea Levels "The Greatest Lie Ever Told"

Discussion in 'Environment' started by Sinatra, Mar 30, 2009.

  1. Sinatra
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    Sinatra Senior Member

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  2. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Real information, not bullshit.
    Catalog Page for PIA11002

    Warming water and melting land ice have raised global mean sea level 4.5 centimeters (1.7 inches) from 1993 to 2008. But the rise is by no means uniform. This image, created with sea surface height data from the Topex/Poseidon and Jason-1 satellites, shows exactly where sea level has changed during this time and how quickly these changes have occurred.

    It’s also a road map showing where the ocean currently stores the growing amount of heat it is absorbing from Earth’s atmosphere and the heat it receives directly from the Sun. The warmer the water, the higher the sea surface rises. The location of heat in the ocean and its movement around the globe play a pivotal role in Earth’s climate.

    Light blue indicates areas in which sea level has remained relatively constant since 1993. White, red, and yellow are regions where sea levels have risen the most rapidly—up to 10 millimeters per year—and which contain the most heat. Green areas have also risen, but more moderately. Purple and dark blue show where sea levels have dropped, due to cooler water.

    The dramatic variation in sea surface heights and heat content across the ocean are due to winds, currents and long-term changes in patterns of circulation. From 1993 to 2008, the largest area of rapidly rising sea levels and the greatest concentration of heat has been in the Pacific, which now shows the characteristics of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), a feature that can last 10 to 20 years or even longer.
     
  3. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    During the history of the Earth, sea levels have varied dramatically from present conditions. During the peak of the last ice age 18,000-20,000 years ago, sea level is estimated to have been about 120 meters (400 feet) lower than it is now. If the vast ice sheets covering Greenland and Antarctica were to melt completely, sea level would rise approximately 80 meters (260 feet) higher than the current value.

    Today's concerns about rising carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and the resulting warming of the world are tied closely to rises in the height of the oceans. In the past, higher atmospheric carbon dioxide levels correlated to elevated global temperatures. Temperature changes of only a few degrees have resulted in dramatic expansion and shrinkage of polar ice and glaciers, leading to pronounced sea level changes.

    Sea Level Deluxe for World Wind allows you to explore the range of sea levels from distant prehistory to potential future scenarios. It is a greatly expanded version of the popular free Sea Level Standard add-on. It contains many added new features, including higher resolution, more maps, contours, flood zones and at-risk cities.

    During the history of the Earth, sea levels have varied dramatically from present conditions. During the peak of the last ice age 18,000-20,000 years ago, sea level is estimated to have been about 120 meters (400 feet) lower than it is now. If the vast ice sheets covering Greenland and Antarctica were to melt completely, sea level would rise approximately 80 meters (260 feet) higher than the current value.

    Today's concerns about rising carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and the resulting warming of the world are tied closely to rises in the height of the oceans. In the past, higher atmospheric carbon dioxide levels correlated to elevated global temperatures. Temperature changes of only a few degrees have resulted in dramatic expansion and shrinkage of polar ice and glaciers, leading to pronounced sea level changes.

    Sea Level Deluxe for World Wind allows you to explore the range of sea levels from distant prehistory to potential future scenarios. It is a greatly expanded version of the popular free Sea Level Standard add-on. It contains many added new features, including higher resolution, more maps, contours, flood zones and at-risk cities.
    During the history of the Earth, sea levels have varied dramatically from present conditions. During the peak of the last ice age 18,000-20,000 years ago, sea level is estimated to have been about 120 meters (400 feet) lower than it is now. If the vast ice sheets covering Greenland and Antarctica were to melt completely, sea level would rise approximately 80 meters (260 feet) higher than the current value.

    Today's concerns about rising carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and the resulting warming of the world are tied closely to rises in the height of the oceans. In the past, higher atmospheric carbon dioxide levels correlated to elevated global temperatures. Temperature changes of only a few degrees have resulted in dramatic expansion and shrinkage of polar ice and glaciers, leading to pronounced sea level changes.

    Sea Level Deluxe for World Wind allows you to explore the range of sea levels from distant prehistory to potential future scenarios. It is a greatly expanded version of the popular free Sea Level Standard add-on. It contains many added new features, including higher resolution, more maps, contours, flood zones and at-risk cities.
    Sea Level Deluxe for NASA World Wind
     
  4. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    And this is not new information

    This column is provided as a public service by the Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, in cooperation with the UAF research community. Ned Rozell is a science writer at the institute.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------http://www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF14/1479.html

    During the last four billion years, Earth has many times flip-flopped from a cold, icy sphere to a greener, warmer place. We’re currently in the latter state, a time scientists call “interglacial” because they expect another ice age to follow. Or will it? Sea level is the highest it has been in 250,000 years, and a warming climate may be stalling Earth’s natural cycle of hot and cold periods.


    Robert Bindschadler’s goal is to find the culprit in the rising of the world’s oceans, which have crept up more than 375 feet since the last ice age. Bindschadler, a glaciologist with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center who visited Fairbanks last week, said oceans have swelled since the last ice age because glaciers and immense sheets of ice have melted. While drastic sea level rises between ice ages are normal, Bindschadler said the planet might never have seen a warm spell like the present one. He wants to learn more about the current sea level rise by looking at Earth’s ice from above.


    Satellites orbiting 500 miles above Earth provide a good look at the larger portions of the world’s ice supply, 90 percent of which is in Antarctica. Antarctica consists of several massive fields of ice, but the smallest one is the most compelling to Bindschadler and others studying sea level rise. The west Antarctic ice sheet, which is about the size of Mexico, might be the main contributor to sea level rise now and in the future. Since the last ice age ended about 20,000 years ago, the west Antarctic ice sheet has lost two-thirds of its mass, probably adding about 30 feet to sea level worldwide. Bindschadler said the west Antarctic ice sits on a bed of slippery ocean sediment rather than bedrock, which means it may collapse into the sea. If the whole ice sheet calves into the sea, it will raise sea level in the world’s oceans another 15 feet.


    In 2001, NASA will launch a satellite that will use a laser beam to measure the size of glaciers and ice sheets. The satellite will shoot the beam down to the ice surface, then record the time it takes for the beam to be reflected. Scientists will check the elevation of ice fields and later compare the information with new readings to see how much melting, calving, or ice growth occurred between satellite passes.


    The new satellite may allow scientists to find out how fast sea level might rise in the future, a statistic that affects most of the people on Earth. Bindschadler said two-to-three billion people live in coastal areas of the world, and a three-foot rise in sea level will slowly destroy as much as $475 billion worth of homes and property in the U.S. alone. He said the rising of the world’s oceans also makes him wonder if people, through the emission of greenhouse gases, have disrupted the planet’s natural succession from ice age to warming period to ice age.


    “Sea level is the highest it’s ever been and climate is about as warm as it’s ever been,” Bindschadler said. “We’re really moving into uncharted territory.”


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------



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  5. driveby
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    driveby Gold Member

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    How much is Al Gore paying you ?
     
  6. Toro
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  7. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Good program. We will find out soon enough how accurate the predictions are.
     
  8. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    How much is Exxon paying you? Simply explore what real scientists are saying concerning sea level and the cryosphere.
     
  9. Sinatra
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    Sinatra Senior Member

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  10. RetiredGySgt
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    RetiredGySgt Platinum Member

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    So it is your contention the Link is written by a NON Scientist?
     

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