Rescuing Ty Cobb....

Discussion in 'Media' started by PoliticalChic, May 2, 2016.

  1. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    ....from the internet....or from Oliver Stone, Comedy Central, or government school...or from Liberalism in general.


    Of course it's easy to accept the gossip, the slanders: one simply sits and nods, absorbs the repetitions.....but that's indoctrination....so very many have been trained to allow others to do their thinking for them.

    It's what allows the dominant political group to pass off lies about opponents.



    "..... Cobb has been portrayed as a virtual psychotic in articles, books, and films, including Ron Shelton’s 1994 feature starring Tommy Lee Jones and Ken Burns’s epic, 18-hour documentary, Baseball, in which Cobb plays the villain to Jackie Robinson’s hero.

    There’s only one problem: this venomous character is predominantly fictional." A Wronged Man



    There is a lesson here that goes well beyond the destruction of a single individual's reputation, and extends to the way far too many of us get our information.
    Best is to remember the insightful words of the finest President of the last 100 years:

    "Trust, but verify."







    1. Case in point.....Ty Cobb, "....one of the greatest baseball players of all time and king of the so-called Deadball Era. He played in the major leagues—mostly for the Detroit Tigers but a bit for the Philadelphia Athletics—from 1905 to 1928, and was the first player ever voted into the Hall of Fame.

    His lifetime batting average of .366 is amazing, and has never been equaled." Who Was Ty Cobb? The History We Know That’s Wrong


    a. "In 1936 Cobb received the most votes of any player on the inauguralBaseball Hall of Fame ballot, .... In 1999,editorsatThe Sporting Newsranked Ty Cobb 3rd on their list of "Baseball's 100 Greatest Players".[1]

    ... credited with setting 90 MLB records during his career.[2][3][4][5]He still holds several records as of the end of the 2014 season, including the highestcareerbatting average(.366 or .367, depending on source) and most careerbatting titleswith 11 (or 12, depending on source).[6]

    ....and themodern recordfor most careerstolen bases(892) until 1977.[12]He still holds the career record for stealing home (54 times) and for stealing second base, third base, and home in succession (5 times), and as the youngest player ever to compile 4,000 hits and score 2,000 runs." Ty Cobb - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    b. "But for all that, most Americans think of him first as an awful person—a racist and a low-down cheat who thought nothing of injuring his fellow players just to gain another base or score a run. Indeed, many think of him as a murderer. "
    Who Was Ty Cobb? The History We Know That’s Wrong




    Here's where most people's knowledge of Cobb comes from:
    2. In the mid-90s, Hollywood made a film about this baseball immortal:

    "Al Stump is a famous sports-writer chosen by Ty Cobb to co-write his official, authorized 'autobiography' before his death. Cobb, widely feared and despised, feels misunderstood and wants to set the record straight about 'the greatest ball-player ever,' in his words.

    However, when Stump spends time with Cobb, interviewing him and beginning to write, he realizes that the general public opinion is largely correct. In Stump's presence, Cobb is angry, violent, racist, misogynistic, and incorrigibly abusive to everyone around him. Torn between printing the truth by plumbing the depths of Cobb's dark soul and grim childhood, and succumbing to Cobb's pressure for a whitewash of his character and a simple baseball tale of his greatness, Stump writes two different books. One book is for Cobb, the other for the public."
    Cobb (1994) - IMDb


    a. And this: " Ron Shelton, the director of the 1995 movieCobb, starring Tommy Lee Jones in the title role, [reported that] it was “well known” that Cobb had killed “as many as” three people." Who Was Ty Cobb? The History We Know That’s Wrong


    b. "Cobb himself wrote shortly before his death, "In legend I am a sadistic, slashing, swashbuckling despot who waged war in the guise of sport." Schwartz, Larry."He was a pain ... but a great pain". ESPN.




    'Say it ain't so!'
    It ain't.


    This is a cautionary tale.

    I'll reveal the truth, and you can see the same process in operation, lies accepted as truth, throughout our society.
     
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  2. Nosmo King
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    Nosmo King Gold Member

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    While Cobb was one of the all time greatest baseball players as his record bears out, that alone does not make him a great human being. Cobb himself admitted that he should have made more friends. Cobb's racism was inexcusable, even for his time. Who among his contemporaries mourned him dead? Who attended his funeral? And why is this the second thread I've counted in an attempt to burnish his image?
     
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  3. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    I hope you have the time and interest to stay tuned....

    ....you will find that you have been totally mislead.

    Nothing you believe about Cobb is true.



    And....I hope you will apply that lesson to other worldviews that you hold most closely.
     
  4. strollingbones
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  5. strollingbones
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  6. strollingbones
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    baseball was much wilder then......ty cobb used no steroids...
     
  7. Alex.
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    Ty Cobb Philanthropist


    "Interestingly, long after he retired from baseball, he established a private foundation (PF) to which he dedicated much of his time and resources in the last decade of his life. His PF endures as a lasting legacy and, over the last 60 years, has awarded more than $15 million in non-athletic scholarships to thousands of Georgia residents. How this dichotomy came about is instructive to estate-planning advisors.


    Cobb’s first foray into significant philanthropy was in 1945 when he funded a hospital in his parents’ memory. For two years, he visited numerous hospitals before donating $100,000 to establish a 25-bed hospital in his hometown of Royston, Ga.

    Cobb’s PF reflects two of his values. As someone who never attended college, he valued education. His father was a high school principal who wanted Cobb to attend college. Unfortunately, Cobb’s mother accidentally killed his father shortly before Cobb was called up by the Detroit Tigers, so his father never saw Cobb reach success. Cobb once commented that he thought baseball players should complete college before turning professional, and education was a value he impressed on his children. His son, Ty Jr., attended Princeton and Yale."

    Cobb also wanted recipients to demonstrate a determination to succeed. For this reason, the scholarships were (and still are) awarded only to students who prove themselves by completing 30 semester hours with a 3.0 grade point average or better."

    Ty Cobb: An Unlikely Philanthropist

    Look beyond the popular stories there are gems to find out about the people we are interested in.
     
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  8. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    3. "Cobb himself wrote shortly before his death, "In legend I am a sadistic, slashing, swashbuckling despot who waged war in the guise of sport." Schwartz, Larry."He was a pain ... but a great pain". ESPN.


    That statement requires a careful reading, and an attention to detail.




    "It is easy to understand why this is the prevailing view. People have been told that Cobb was a bad man over and over, all of their lives. The repetition felt like evidence."
    This explanation of the Cobb statement was written by Charles Leerhsen, whose recent book, is about Cobb..."Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty."


    a. The Boston Globe notes:

    "But if veteran sportswriter Leerhsen is correct about Cobb — and his book is assiduously researched and his points lucidly expressed — then “A Terrible Beauty” is not only the best work ever written on this American sports legend: It’s a major reconsideration of a reputation unfairly maligned for decades." Review of “Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty” by Charles Leerhsen - The Boston Globe


    ".... assiduously researched....a reputation unfairly maligned..."


    I'll provide some of that research.
     
  9. PoliticalChic
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    Let's start at the beginning.....the origin of the personal destruction of Cobb.....

    4. " It started soon after Cobb’s death in 1961, with the publication of an article by a man named Al Stump, one of several articles and books he would write about Cobb.

    .... Stump claimed that when children wrote to Cobb asking for an autographed picture, he steamed the stamps off the return envelopes and never wrote back.

    ...baseball historian Timothy Gay wrote (implausibly, if you think about it) that Cobb would pistol-whip any black person he saw on the sidewalk.

    And then there were the stories about how Cobb sharpened his spikes: before every game,

    In the 1989 filmField of Dreams, Shoeless Joe Jackson says that Cobb wasn’t invited to the ghostly cornfield reunion of old-time ballplayers because “No one liked that son of a bitch.” The line always gets a knowing laugh."
    Imprimis, Op. Cit.




    And, sure enough, several of these lies have been repeated by the mislead, earlier in this thread.




    Hence.....the 'common knowledge' about Cobb.


    Leerhsen continues: " But when I started in on the nuts-and-bolts research with original sources—the kind of shoe-leather reporting I had learned working atNewsweekin its heyday—it didn’t even take me ten minutes to find something that brought me up short....

    .... searching old issues of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.I quickly came across a curious article written in late 1911, after the baseball season had ended, when Cobb was touring in a three-act comedy called The College Widow.

    (In those days, ballplayers ... often capitalized on their fame by appearing in plays or vaudeville.) The writer of the article was recounting a backstage visit with Cobb, and described him as a man who very much wanted to please the audience. Cobb was also going out of his way to accommodate the interviewer (who was asking tedious questions) while simultaneously being hospitable to a second guest—a catcher he had played with in the minor leagues—who showed up in the small dressing room smoking a cigar. "


    The episode doesn't seem to fit with “No one liked that son of a bitch.”




    "...he was just doing what any decent person would do—being as polite as possible...."
    Ibid.

    Could it be that the other allegations are equally false?
    Could be.
    Coming right up.....
     
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  10. PoliticalChic
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    Excellent article.....certainly runs counter to the myths.
     

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