Rashid Khalid on Egypt's protests economist.com/video

Discussion in 'Middle East - General' started by P F Tinmore, Feb 7, 2011.

  1. P F Tinmore
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    P F Tinmore Platinum Member

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  2. Jos
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    Jos BANNED

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    US envoy's business link to Egypt

    US envoy's business link to Egypt - Americas, World - The Independent
     
  3. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Egyptian army don't want to go up against Israel again...
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    Egypt army commits to power transfer, Israel peace
    12 Feb.`11 — On Egypt's first day in nearly 30 years without Hosni Mubarak as president, its new military rulers pledged Saturday to eventually hand power to an elected civilian government and outlined its first cautious steps in a promised transition to democracy. It reassured the world that it will abide by its peace deal with Israel.
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    Uncertain future for U.S. policy as Egypt shifts
    12 Feb.`11 WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States faces an intensely uncertain future in Egypt, a stalwart ally of decades in the volatile Middle East, where key tenets of American foreign policy are now thrown into doubt.
     
  4. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Egypt and Tunisia becoming the blueprint for democracy...
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    Egypt revolt becomes global case study
    Feb 19,`11 -- It seems naive to hope the fallout from cataclysmic events in the Middle East and North Africa can spill beyond the region and stir distant, repressed populations with no cultural or historical affinity. Yet successful uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia have captivated dissidents and activists around the world who have campaigned in vain for radical change, in some cases for decades.
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    Tunisia’s long-hidden poor seize public land
    Sun, Feb 20, 2011 - Near an olive grove on the outskirts of Tunisia’s seaside capital, men stack walls of bricks on muddy earth, and fasten roofs of tin and plastic against the wind-blown rain.
     

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