Rape, abortion and the fight for women's rights in Turkey

Discussion in 'Middle East - General' started by kirkuki, Sep 11, 2012.

  1. kirkuki
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    kirkuki Member

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    In Turkey, outside big cities, social life concentrates on coffee houses, that is, if you are a man. This week, the customers of a coffee house in a village in the Mediterranean region saw a young woman carrying a bloody sack. Inside was a severed head. She hurled the sack towards them and said: "I saved my honour. Do not talk behind my back any more."

    The woman was 26-year-old Nevin Yildirim, a mother of two. Her husband had been away working at a seasonal job in another town. In his absence Nurettin Gider, aged 35 and a father of two, had raped her repeatedly, taken photos of her naked, and blackmailed her. She had become pregnant. He had been boasting about his visits to her house to his drinking buddies, and there were people in the village who knew what was going on.

    She shot him 10 times, stabbed him in the abdomen and cut off his head. She turned herself in, and told the police she would rather die than have the baby. Her seven-year-old daughter was about to start school this autumn. She said she didn't want anyone to call her children "the whore's kids". Instead, they would be seen as "the children of a woman who had cleansed her honour".

    The case has caused an uproar in Turkey. Women's organisations have rallied to her support, her story has received wide coverage in the media, the social media has buzzed with remarks, and an appeal has been made for her to have an abortion. As I write, the court has announced its decision against the appeal. Yildirim turned out to be 29 weeks pregnant, past the legal limit to terminate a pregnancy, which is 10 weeks. In cases where a woman's health is endangered, abortion can be allowed at up to 20 weeks.

    The court's decision sparked a debate with deep moral, social and political implications. Not long ago, members of the government discussed limiting, if not banning, both caesarean section and abortion rights in Turkey. The health minister, Recep Akdag, had said that should any children be born as a result of rape or violence, the government would take care of them. The proposal on abortion was fiercely opposed across society, as a result of which it was shelved. The laws regarding C-section, however, have been changed and the procedure greatly limited.

    The truth is, recent debates on women's bodies and reproduction rights have left a bad taste in the mouths of us Turkish women. The suddenness of the proposal and the lack of a genuine, pluralistic debate left many women uncomfortable and worried about the future. Turkish women have enjoyed greater rights than their sisters in other parts of the Muslim world. But all of a sudden, women realised the rights they had taken for granted could one day be taken away.

    For women in Turkey who are victims of domestic or sexual violence, there are few doors to knock on. There are few women's shelters, and too often society tends to judge the victim, not the perpetrator. Every year women are killed or forced to commit suicide in the name of honour. In a context as unfair as this, we need politicians who are sensitive to women's problems and dedicated to solving them. However, unlike other areas of life in Turkey, local and national politics remains stubbornly patriarchal.

    Yildirim's baby needs to be treated as a free individual and raised with love and care in a healthy environment where he or she won't be stigmatised. Yet Turkey is far from there. This is a male-dominated country where codes of honour run deep and it is always women who pay the price – women, and at times their innocent children.

    Rape, abortion and the fight for women's rights in Turkey | Elif Shafak | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk
     
  2. ekrem
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    ekrem VIP Member

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    The Guardian
    Why do you cut vaginas of your daughters?
    You sick fuck, next time you want to play morale-compass you vetter shut the fuck up.
     
  3. GHook93
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    GHook93 Aristotle

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    Turkey is as fucked up as the Arab nations, Iranian, Pakistan and Afghanistan! They Murder women who get raped calling them whores, not victims. Fathers and brothers honor kill their daughters and sisters for falling in love before marriage. Women are beaten and raped for dressing to "western." Educated women and one's who work are the target of Islamofacists. And the government protects abuses against women, because that is the Sharia way!

     
  4. ekrem
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    ekrem VIP Member

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    Yes, Turkey has major issues with women-rights.

    http://www.europarl.europa.eu/committees/en/femm/studiesdownload.html?languageDocument=EN&file=27960
    (European Parliament Commitee for Women's Rights and Gender Equality)

    You can get the data from the linked PDF:

    - Illiteracy rate among Women in South-East Turkey is 39 %.
    - Only 62% of girls in South-East Turkey are enrolled in school.
    - Only 9% of women in South-East Turkey completed middle-school.


    There are issues on women-rights in other regions of Turkey also, including crimes and murder. But women in other parts of Turkey are much more likely to use their rights and call for help (Police or civil-society) when they witness family violence. This can be connected to the literacy rate.

    If you cage your daughter at home and don't send her to school she'll grow up as an illiterate. She'll know nothing about constitutional rights or how life should be for a girl in the normal life. She will have seen nothing else than her patriarchic male family members.

    Their tribal structure in South-East Turkey forbids women to participate in contemporary life.
    At least they don't cut the genitals of their daughters like the Kurds in Iraq do.
    Nevertheless the State-Authority will continue to fight against these medievalists and will (sooner or later) achieve to equalize living-standards in South-East with the other regions. It's still a tough fight against such mindset.
     
  5. GHook93
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    GHook93 Aristotle

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    Blaming and singling out the oppressed minority group as the cause of all your societies problems, oh how Muslim of you! Your country doesn't have any Jews, so go to the next best thing - the Kurds!
     
  6. ekrem
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    ekrem VIP Member

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    HDI (Human Development Index).
    The greener the better.

    Believe me, life for a woman is much much different living in Antalya compared to Hakkari or Diyarbakir.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2012
  7. ekrem
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    ekrem VIP Member

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    And I didn't single out a "minority group".
    But here we have a PKK terrorist-sympathizing Kurd starting a thread to throw mud at Turks on women-issue.

    I provided sources, that in-fact his kind is one of the most anti-women creature walking over this planet, no normal man would cut genitals of her daughter.
     
  8. ekrem
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