Questions on Fiscal Policy Put G.O.P. on the Defensive

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Synthaholic, Aug 13, 2011.

  1. Synthaholic
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    Synthaholic Platinum Member

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    Questions on Fiscal Policy Put G.O.P. on the Defensive


    Onetime standard-bearers of Republican economic philosophy are among those saying the short-term focus should be on stimulus.

    WASHINGTON — The boasts of Congressional Republicans about their cost-cutting victories are ringing hollow to some well-known economists, financial analysts and corporate leaders, including some Republicans, who are expressing increasing alarm over Washington’s new austerity and antitax orthodoxy.

    Their critiques have grown sharper since last week, when President Obama signed his deficit reduction deal with Republicans and, a few days later, when Standard & Poor’s downgraded the credit rating of the United States.


    But even before that, macroeconomists and private sector forecasters were warning that the direction in which the new House Republican majority had pushed the White House and Congress this year — for immediate spending cuts, no further stimulus measures and no tax increases, ever — was wrong for addressing the nation’s two main ills, a weak economy now and projections of unsustainably high federal debt in coming years.


    Instead, these critics say, Washington should be focusing on stimulating the economy in the near term to induce people to spend money and create jobs, while settling on a long-term plan for spending cuts and tax increases to take effect only after the economy recovers.


    But Republicans in Congress and on the presidential campaign trail refuse to back down.


    *snip*
     
  2. FuelRod
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    FuelRod Gold Member

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    The only fiscal policy that matters is the same one people have to leave by.
    Don't spend more money than you have.
     
  3. Synthaholic
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    Synthaholic Platinum Member

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    That's nice. But the focus of the OP is stimulus spending.
     
  4. Sundial
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    Sundial Class Warrior

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    Every successful business in the country uses debt and equity to spend more than what they have.
     
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  5. Leweman
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    Leweman Gold Member

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    100 percent more than they are worth?
     
  6. CrusaderFrank
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    CrusaderFrank Diamond Member

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    Stimulus has failed...we need more stimulus!
     
  7. mascale
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    mascale VIP Member

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    Some stimulus spending was futile from the start. One third went to preservative funding of state and local governments--about to increase the layoffs of their pricey people. Three private sector jobs can be created for what it costs to fund two public sector jobs, so two were chosen, instead of three(?)! That was not an efficient use of spending.

    Stock Market short sales in Europe have been a profits bonanza for the participants, and a disaster for everyone else. So Great Euro Socialism banned short sales in the stock markets. That has not been an efficient use of spending.

    Europe

    Government in civilized nations is everywhere engaged in regulatory market intervention. What most of the successful interventions did was to create public works spending. China was the most successful, and comes out ahead because of Great Socialism. Australia, Canada and other white nation-states did the same.

    In the United States we have the Party of Abraham Lincoln, and the sitting President mostly admires the habus corpus suspending, martial-law imposing, political opposition jailing, oppostion-press shuttering, adulation prayer-compelling: Sonofabitch who gave all the socialists a bad name! Europe could follow the role-model.

    Government intervention Republican-Style was more closely embraced by the Nazis, and even to various attempts at the genocides of the white peoples.

    The recent stimulus spending created such famous projects as the roofs on the toilet outhouses in the parks at Mammoth Lakes resort, in California. Likely only that governor--of the collaborative father--was on board.

    Clearly, the White House was on board.

    "Crow, James Crow: Shaken, Not Stirred!"
    (Many Squaws come to Lands of Many Nations: Showing that where and why money is spent, is as important as how much!)
     
  8. Synthaholic
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    Synthaholic Platinum Member

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    Stimulus hasn't been tried. Not once it was hijacked by Regressives, with over 40% of it being tax cuts.
     
  9. Synthaholic
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    Synthaholic Platinum Member

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    Looks like the wingnuts are finally getting the message:




    WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Having said no to taxes for months, Republicans now are saying maybe, in the face of public disgust over a deadlock in the Congress, a near government default and a worsening global economic crisis.

    Prompting some hope for a return to fiscal order are the statements and reputations of some of the six Republicans named this week to join with six Democrats on a special committee to end the standoff over the U.S. deficit.

    In one of his first interviews after being named to the "Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction," Representative Dave Camp told Reuters, "I don't want to rule anything in or out" when the panel starts its work.

    That's a far cry from what had been a Republican wall of opposition to any tax increases when President Barack Obama negotiated a $917 billion deficit-reduction down payment with Republicans that also was aimed at raising U.S. borrowing authority by August 2.

    Public disgust with the long, bitter budget and debt limit fight that has consumed Washington all year could have played a role in the less confrontational tone.
     
  10. Synthaholic
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    Synthaholic Platinum Member

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    Funny how the wingnuts avoid threads like these . . .
     

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