Question to Naval Battle Jack wavers?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by SpidermanTuba, Jan 7, 2006.

  1. SpidermanTuba
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    SpidermanTuba BANNED

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    Here's a Question for all who choose to display their Southern Pride by waving a confederate naval battle jack:

    Why the Naval Battle Jack in particular?

    Why not the Bonnie Blue? Why not one of the two national flags that flew after the Bonnie Blue?

    Why not the actual Confederate Battle Flag?
     
  2. Hobbit
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    Hobbit Senior Member

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    There were 3 Confederate national flags, one battle flag, and one Navy jack. The first flag, known as the "Stars and Bars," was removed for its uncanny similarity to the American flag. It also was made before the Confederacy had fully formed, and didn't have a star for every state. The other two national flags had the battle flag, containing one star per state, as part of them. The battle flag itself was the most recognized symbol of the Confederacy, as the Confederacy only existed during a time of war, and there were more battle flags than national flags. However, the battle flag does not have the same dimensions as a standard flag, causing a few problems along the way. The Navy jack, on the other hand, has the same dimensions as a standard flag and is, in essence, a stretched battle flag, making it easily recognizable as confederate. Personally, I think all 5 flags are very pretty and I like seeing them fly at Civil War memorials in memory of those who fought and died for what they believed in, whether they lost or not (btw, only about 5% of the Confederate Army owned slaves, so the idea that they were fighting for slavery is an age-old fallacy prepetuated by black lobbyists in an effort to paint anyone associated with Southern slave owners as evil). I also have a set of all 5 sitting in my room...below the American flag, of course. In conclusion, I'll assume that you actually wanted the above answer, but you're probably just nitpicking as some weak excuse to try to discredit those who happen to like the Confederate flag, whether they use it as a racist symbol or not.

    P.S. Nothing enrages me more than white supremicists using that flag to represent their agendas. The Confederate Flag stood for states' rights, not slavery.
     
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  3. SpidermanTuba
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    Why would a Naval Battle Jack be appropriate on the land?

    The point I'm making is (manyfold):

    A) I have no moral preference for either side in the War of Northern Aggression. The Confederacy was doing the exact thing the U.S. did less than 100 years ago - fighting for the right to make its own laws, one of those happening to be the legal keeping of slaves. In this respect, none of the confederate flags are any more racist than the U.S. flag.

    B) There were 5 confederate flags. Most (not you) southerns who want to display southern pride choose to fly only one of them, and many of these folks are even ignorant of the fact that there are 5 to choose from.

    C) The KKK murdered, assaulted, raped, intimidated, robbed, lynched - you name it - black people and those who supported civil rights under only ONE of these flags. The Naval Battle Jack. Why they chose that one, I know not.

    D) Coincidence that of the 5 flags available, most of those who want to display a confederate flag choose the ONE that the KKK flew?

    E) Irregardless of the fact that the Battle Jack in the Civil War represented something good and right - or at least as good and right as our own US flag did during the revolution - the KKK and others have tainted the flag and made it into something else. We cannot ignore this fact. To do so would be the same as, say, a bunch of Indians ignoring the holocaust and raising up the Swastika to display their Hindu pride (in this country, as opposed to India where the symbol might have different meaning attached to it)


    That being said, anyone who thought that someone who had a collection of all 5 flags was racist would simply be ignorant of history.

    However, if you run around waving the one and only flag of the KKK - which also happens to be one of 5 flags of the confederacy - the logical conclusion is you are simply trying to say "F*** the blacks".
     
  4. trobinett
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    trobinett Senior Member

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    I was agreeing with you, right up to the last paragraph.

    Just a little sensitive on the choice of flags, I`d say.

    We are ONE nation, many cultures, many races, but ALL Americans, most deal with it just fine, others don`t, such is life.

    Put a period on it, and move on.
     
  5. 5stringJeff
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    5stringJeff Senior Member

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    I personally own a Star and Bars flag, which, until my son was born, hung in our thrid bedroom. Eventually, I'd like to own three flagpoles, flying the U.S. flag, the Stars and Bars, and my state flag.
     
  6. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    I am curious as to why you refer to the Confederate Battle flag as the "naval battle jack."

    "The Army of Northern Virginia was the first to design a flag with the cross of St. Andrew, and Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard proposed adopting a version of it as the standard battle flag of the Confederate army. The Harper's Weekly Image above shows Beauregard's Arkansas troops serving under the "Stars and Bars" flag in 1861. The Army of Northern Virginia can be seen serving under the "Southern Cross" in 1862. One of its virtues was that, unlike the Stars and Bars, the Southern Cross was next to impossible to confuse with the Stars and Stripes in battle. The Confederate battle flag eventually developed wide acceptance 0throughout the Confederacy, but it was by no means the only battle flag."

    http://www.sonofthesouth.net/leefoundation/Confederate_Flag.htm

    http://mshistory.k12.ms.us/features/feature2/histconflag.html
     
  7. Hobbit
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    Hobbit Senior Member

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    As I stated before, the Confederate Battle Flag is a perfect square, rather than the standard sized ~1:2 height:width ratio. The 1:2 ratio Confederate Battle Flag was actually the Confederate Naval Jack. However, throughout the years, it has basically just become a differently shaped Battle Flag.
     

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