Putting our Planets in Perspective.

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by dmp, Jul 17, 2006.

  1. dmp
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    dmp Senior Member

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    VERY Cool, thanks to member "BillyBadAss"

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  2. dmp
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    dmp Senior Member

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    Oh...and yeah, All this happened by ACCIDENT...RANDOM CHANCE.... :-/

    :rolleyes:

    :)
     
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  3. Nienna
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    Nienna Senior Member

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    Wow. Awe-inspiring.
     
  4. KarlMarx
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    KarlMarx Senior Member

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    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4i6B7HzijSo[/ame]
     
  5. Nienna
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    Nienna Senior Member

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  6. KarlMarx
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    KarlMarx Senior Member

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    Sirius - the Dog Star, located in the constellation of Canis Major, also the brightest star in our night sky (can be seen in fall/winter)

    Pollux - one of the two stars in the constellation Gemini named after "the twins", the other is Castor (can be seen in fall/winter)

    Rigel and Betelgeuse - both are in the constellation of Orion, Betelgeuse is the reddish star (can be seen in fall/winter)

    Aldeberan - reddish star in the constellation of Taurus, the Bull, it's supposed to be his eye (can be seen in fall/winter)

    Antrares - reddish star in the constellation of Scorpio (can be seen in spring and summer)
     
  7. bobn
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    bobn Member

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    Those two massive stars will eventually collapse in on themselves and go supernova. The remenants from that supernova will likely combine into many smaller stars such as our own and form many planets orbiting them. Our sun and planet is the product of such a supernova of a giant star billions of years in the past.
     
  8. PsuedoGhost
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    PsuedoGhost Member

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    Who said anything about random chance having to do anything with the formation of stellar bodies? We understand for the most part the forces at play in the formation of planetoids and stars. We understand the life cycle of said bodies. We understand a tremendous amount of what happens out there. But to say that we understand everything would be a false statement.

    The only randomness in the formation of stellar bodies occurs at the quantum level.
     
  9. KarlMarx
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    KarlMarx Senior Member

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    I wouldn't say the quantum world is random. I'd say it obeys the laws of probability in a more direct way than the macro world. There is still some organization to it.
     
  10. Hobbit
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    Hobbit Senior Member

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    Yeah, I subscribe to chaos theory. Nothing is truly random, but the order to some things is too complex for us to comprehend.
     

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