Power In the Pacific

Discussion in 'Asia' started by Annie, May 14, 2005.

  1. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Things could change if China keeps up the aggression:

    http://www.strategypage.com/dls/articles/2005512213835.asp

     
  2. onedomino
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    onedomino SCE to AUX

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    Actually the strongest military power in East Asia is the United States. Combined with Japan, S. Korea, and Australia, the US presents overwhelming military power vs. China. Also, the GDP figures cited in the above report are misleading. "Using market exchange rates rather than PPP rates, Japan's economy is larger than China's." http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/ja.html. It is through market exchange rates, for example, that oil must be purchased. It will take many years for the Chinese to militarily match Japan-America. And then only if the Japanese-American alliance stands still (which it will not), and the EU sells high-tech weapons to the PLA. The French are desperate to create a "multi-polar" world containing a superpower that will threaten and drain the economic strength of America. Only the Chinese will, in the near future, have the economic strength to accomplish the French goal. However, the French realize that America has a superior military position in East Asia. That is one of the reasons that Chirac is so intent on selling high-tech weapons to China. Militarily, the Chinese are focusing on: missiles and submarines with which to threaten the US fleet and Taiwan. They are also moving military assets far inland in order to get away from the US Navy's striking power. The inland shift of China’s military assets is one of the reasons that US bases in Afghanistan and the former Soviet Republics of Central-East Asia have increased in importance. The cover story in the June 2005 issue of Atlantic magazine is an interesting article titled: "How We Would Fight China." Unfortunately, the Atlantic Online website only has the first few paragraphs of the article. I had the chance to read the complete article at the UCSB library. http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/prem/200506/kaplan
     
  3. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I agree with your assessment, I think Japan is going to have to rearm itself, which may bring other problems down the line, but choices need to be made. The US is by far the strongest power in the Pacific, but as far as the East/Far East, it would be good to have a friendly armed ally. We are not building subs nor ships now, the way the Chinese are. I am going to the Atlantic Online article, I think Nato was discussing it very recently.
     
  4. NATO AIR
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    NATO AIR Senior Member

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    A large advantage for the Japanese is their constant training with us and the Australians. Add in the Indians and you now have a hell of a fighting force.

    good info though.
     

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