Police State

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by nbdysfu, Jan 1, 2004.

  1. nbdysfu
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    nbdysfu Member

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    **Were you expecting something about the patriot act here?**


    China online dissident 'charged'


    Beijing is wary of the powers of the internet
    A man has been arrested in China for voicing dissent over the internet, a human rights group has said.
    Li Zhi, a 32-year-old local official from Dazhou, in Sichuan province, has been charged with conspiracy to subvert state power, the Human Rights in China (HRIC) group reported.

    Mr Li was detained on 8 August and formally charged on 3 September, according to HRIC.

    He could face 15 years in prison if found guilty, the group said.

    Mr Li is not the first Chinese citizen to be punished for his use of the internet in recent years.

    Four internet journalists were given long prison sentences in June for subversion, after posting online appeals calling for political change.

    HRIC said it deplored "the suppression and persecution of people seeking to peacefully express their views over the internet".

    There has so far been no comment from the authorities in China.

    Cracking down on dissent

    Mr Li frequently expressed his views on online bulletin boards and chat rooms, HRIC said in a statement.

    He has also been accused of communicating online with overseas dissidents, the group said, quoting unnamed sources.

    Monitoring e-mail and internet chat rooms is an unacceptable invasion of privacy

    Liu Qing, HRIC president


    The Chinese authorities are keen to promote the commercial potential of the internet, but are anxious to control its political content.

    The campaign group Reporters Without Borders estimates that China employs 30,000 people to watch what its people are doing online.

    Filters installed by the government ban access to foreign websites run by dissidents, human rights groups and some news organisations.

    The content of domestic sites is also carefully monitored.

    Reporters Without Borders estimates that 36 people have been arrested and jailed in recent years for putting controversial content on the internet.

    Liu Qing, the president of HRIC, said: "Monitoring e-mail and internet chat rooms is an unacceptable invasion of privacy, and a reprehensible method of gathering evidence for prosecution of a political crime."

    News of Mr Li's arrest came just days after US Secretary of State Colin Powell said that China was not doing enough to improve its human rights record.

    "We hope the (US) Government will take particular note of this case and press for the immediate release of Li Zhi," Mr Liu said.
     
  2. nbdysfu
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    nbdysfu Member

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  3. 5stringJeff
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    5stringJeff Senior Member

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    Very apt title for the thread. China is among the worst police states in the world, yet not much is ever said about them, except the pieces that come out once every few months about the "extraoridnary leaps in freedom" that the ChiComs are taking.
     
  4. nbdysfu
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    nbdysfu Member

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    Such is to be had when you've spent the last half century killing, impoverishing, starving or imprisoning all of your philosophically/intellectually opposite countrymen I guess. Everybody seems to have forgotten Tianamen Square.
     
  5. nbdysfu
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    nbdysfu Member

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    Ooh. Here's another one:


    AP Article:
    _________________ ___________________
    Chinese Police Told to Deal With Media
    Fri Jan 2, 6:38 AM ET

    By TED ANTHONY, Associated Press Writer

    BEIJING - Here's a new notion for China: a publicly accountable police force.



    The Ministry of Public Security said Friday that police departments across the country must start issuing regular news releases to "promote transparency of police affairs." The announcement was carried on Xinhua, the government's news agency.


    All police departments must hold at least one news conference before Jan. 22, the Chinese New Year, to mark the start of the new policy, Xinhua said, quoting Meng Hongwei, assistant to the minister.


    Most of the news releases will deal with criminal cases, car accidents, disasters and public protection.


    Police in China frequently hang up on reporters calling for information or, more commonly, say they are "unclear" about the situation no matter how straightforward the question.


    Many authorities simply refer reporters to numbers that ring unanswered — or to local Communist Party offices, where staff members have no idea why they're being called.


    In more serious circumstances, reporters — both domestic and foreign — have been detained and sometimes punished for their attempts at reporting police-related events, particularly coal mine disasters.


    Under the new rules, provincial-level public security departments and the ministry itself will hold news conferences once a month, while local bureaus will hold them "once a fortnight" — or every week, if necessary.


    "Public security departments (should) also file immediate media reports of sudden events," Xinhua said.


    China's press is entirely state-controlled, though recent orders from the central government are pushing it toward more editorial independence. That could make news outlets more difficult to rein in.
    _________________ ___________________
    link
     
  6. NightTrain
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    NightTrain VIP Member

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    LOL

    Keep an eye out for those silent Black Helicopters.
     
  7. eric
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    eric Guest

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    Oh man, this guy is too much !!:laugh:
     
  8. wonderwench
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    wonderwench Guest

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    He is fun, isn't he?

    China is quickly moving from Communism to Fascism. It's a frightening trajectory.

    There was a blurb in the news recently about the Communist Party considering favoring privatization of certain ventures. It doesn't take much imagination to figure out that the party faithful will get the deals.

    The one big chip in the game to prevent this from happening is social unrest from sexually frustrated young men. The policy of killing baby girls has caught up with China. The lack of marriagable young women is going to reach a crisis point.

    And then what will happen?
     
  9. NightTrain
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    NightTrain VIP Member

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    Hmmmm

    It appears that Anslinger loves that 'delete' function... this is the second post I've notice him removing after the fact.
     
  10. jimnyc
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    jimnyc ...

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    I hope he didn't love it too much, his right to do so has just been revoked.
     

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