Paying the Price, AGW and Canada

Discussion in 'Environment' started by Old Rocks, Nov 1, 2011.

  1. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    http://nrtee-trnee.ca/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/paying-the-price.pdf

    This report by the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) — the fourth in our Climate Prosperity series — sets out what those costs could be. It makes clear that while there is an environmental cost to climate change, there is an economic cost too: a cost of letting climate impacts occur and a cost to adapting to protect ourselves from these impacts.

    Having highlighted some of the likely physical impacts of warming temperatures and changing precipitation patterns from climate change in Canada in our second report, Degrees of Change, we undertook new analysis to assess the economic costs in this companion report, Paying the Price.This report represents the first time a national analysis of this kind, using various climate and growth scenarios, has been conducted to calculate how the economic costs of climate change stack up over time.

    This is necessary research that allows Canadians to appreciate just how pervasive and pernicious climate change can be. It shows the uncertainty of estimating economic impacts of climate change and increases our understanding of how to assess climate risk and our own willingness to accept — or not — the probability of more damages for future generations. It then identifies how adaptation measures can reduce those costs,
    saving money and lives.
     
  2. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    I'm shocked. There is a price tag on climate change ? Who will get rich ?
     
  3. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    The Atlas of Canada - Coastal Sensitivity to Sea-Level Rise

    Theme
    Climate warming is expected to cause warming of the oceans and the partial melting of glaciers and ice-caps, resulting in a global rise in sea level. By the end of this century, the global mean sea-level rise could amount to 0.09 to 0.88 metres (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 2001). In Canada, where the total coastline exceeds 203 000 kilometres, sea level rise is a significant issue.

    This map shows the sensitivity of the coastlines of Canada to the expected rise in sea level, due to climate warming. Sensitivity here means the degree to which a coastline may experience physical changes such as flooding, erosion, beach migration, and coastal dune destabilization. It is measured by a sensitivity index, which is a modified version of the coastal vulnerability index of Gornitz (1990). This sensitivity index is obtained by manipulating scores of 1 to 5 attributed to each of seven variables: relief, geology, coastal landform, sea-level tendency, shoreline displacement, tidal range, and wave height.
     
  4. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Climate Change Scenarios for Hudson Bay, Canada, from General Circulation Models | Gough | ARCTIC

    Climate Change Scenarios for Hudson Bay, Canada, from General Circulation Models
    William A. Gough, Edmund Wolfe


    Abstract


    Two generations of a climate model are compared using the impact of a CO2 doubling on the Hudson Bay region as the means of diagnosing differences in model performance. Surface temperature, precipitation, sea-ice coverage, and permafrost distribution are compared. The most striking difference is the response of the sea ice in the two models. In the coupled atmosphere-ocean climate model, sea ice virtually disappears in Hudson Bay. This leads to a substantially higher regional temperature response. We suggest that conductivity of sea ice and thermal diffusivity of seawater are key factors that cause the difference in sea-ice response. It is recommended that a regional model be developed to produce more representative climate change scenarios for the Hudson Bay region.

    Key words: Hudson Bay, climate modeling, climate change scenarios, sea ice, permafrost, global warming



    Full Text: PDF
     
  5. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    But somehow I am not shocked that you did not even bother to read what was said. Just responded in a typically inane fashion.
     
  6. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    It's an inane topic. If our climate changes we all can just enjoy the ride. Got any plans for when our sun explodes ?
     
  7. Bigfoot
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    Bigfoot NRA

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    There has been no warming for the past decade, actually a bit longer. Before that there was a one degree increase in the previous 40 to 50 years. Try looking at the sun for a change...it might lead you to some decent info Empty Rocks.
     
  8. bripat9643
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    What costs?

    Let's see:
    1. Longer growing season. Bigger harvests.
    2. Lower heating costs, Lower energy consumption.
    3. Less seasonal wear and tear on highways and other infrastruture.
    4. Fewer deaths from exposure.
    5. Fewer winter related accidents.
    6. Less money for winter clothing.
    7. Less money spent on ice-breakers.

    Where are the costs?

     
  9. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Well, Pattycake, that is not what the scientists involved in the study project. Yes, some positives, but a great many more negatives.
     
  10. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    OK, guy. You are speaking from profound ignorance, using talking points that have no relation to reality.

    The last decade has been the warmest on record. 2010 tied 1998 for heat, yet had a moderate El Nino. And a strong La Nina in the last half of the year. Here is Dr. Spencer's graph for troposphere temperatures for the last 32 years. Do you see a cooling in that?

    UAH Global Temperature Update for September 2011: +0.29 deg. C « Roy Spencer, Ph. D.

    Note that since 2001, there has only been one low average temp that was as low as the highest average temps prior to 1997.
     

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