Over 3 million jobs lost, but 1.4 million crappy jobs created

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Psychoblues, Jun 30, 2004.

  1. Psychoblues
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    Psychoblues Senior Member

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    I don't call that anything to brag about. Economically speaking, of course.

    Psychoblues
     
  2. HGROKIT
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    HGROKIT Active Member

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    It was on his pop-top. :D
     
  3. OCA
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    OCA Senior Member

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    No links, no proof, no nothing. Just like his life its hyperbole.
     
  4. Psychoblues
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    Psychoblues Senior Member

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    You cat's listen only selectively for what you want to hear, don't you?

    Psychoblues
     
  5. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    What did I miss? That isn't making sense, can you explain? Please. :D
     
  6. Psychoblues
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    Psychoblues Senior Member

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    I wouldn't expect much more from an administration that would advocate renaming hamburger flippers from service to manufacturing. It looks better on paper, don't you know? But you still don't "get it", do you?

    Psychoblues
     
  7. Big D
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    Big D Guest

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    I think Psychoblues theory is more right then wrong.

    And here is some proof:

    While politicians and news media reports have focused on the numbers of jobs lost and gained in this postrecession U.S. recovery -- there has been a net loss of 2.3 million jobs since 2001 -- very little has been said about the disparity in pay between jobs lost and jobs gained.
    http://www.freep.com/money/business/jobs30_20040130.htm
     
  8. MtnBiker
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    MtnBiker Senior Member

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    Industry Payroll Employment (Establishment Survey Data)

    Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 248,000 in May to 131.2 million,
    seasonally adjusted. Since its recent low in August 2003, payroll employment
    has risen by 1.4 million; 947,000 of this increase occurred over the last 3
    months. Job growth was widespread in May, with gains continuing in construc-
    tion, manufacturing, and several service-providing industries. (See table
    B-1.)

    In May, construction employment increased by 37,000, with most of the gain
    occurring in specialty trade contracting and the construction of buildings.
    Since March 2003, the construction industry has added about a quarter-million
    jobs.

    Manufacturing employment grew by 32,000 in May. Since January, manufactur-
    ing has added 91,000 jobs, mostly in its durable goods component. In May, em-
    ployment rose in three construction-related manufacturing industries: fabri-
    cated metal products, wood products, and nonmetallic mineral products (such
    as concrete and cement). Employment also increased in computer and electronic
    products.

    Mining employment continued to rise in May. Since January, the industry
    has added 18,000 jobs.

    In the service-providing sector, professional and business services added
    64,000 jobs in May. Employment in temporary help services continued to rise
    (31,000) and has grown by 299,000 (or 14 percent) since April 2003.

    Strong employment increases in health care and social assistance continued
    in May with a gain of 36,000. Over the year, this industry has added 274,000
    jobs. Hospitals and ambulatory health care services, such as outpatient care
    centers, accounted for two-thirds of May's employment gain.

    Within the leisure and hospitality industry, food services added 33,000 jobs
    over the month. Since the beginning of the year, employment in food services
    has increased by an average of 32,000 a month, more than double the average
    monthly increase in 2003.

    Employment in financial activities rose by 15,000 in May, reflecting con-
    tinued increases in real estate and in credit intermediation. Retail employ-
    ment continued to trend upward in May; over the year, the industry has added
    142,000 jobs. Within retail trade, employment edged up in May in building
    material and garden supply stores, food and beverage stores, and clothing
    stores. Wholesale trade employment also edged up in May; the industry has
    added 55,000 jobs since October 2003.

    In the information sector, telecommunications employment was down by 5,000
    in May. Since its peak in March 2001, the telecommunications industry has shed
    283,000 jobs, a fifth of its total.

    - 4 -

    Weekly Hours (Establishment Survey Data)

    The average workweek for production or nonsupervisory workers on private
    nonfarm payrolls was unchanged in May at 33.8 hours, seasonally adjusted. The
    manufacturing workweek increased by 0.4 hour to 41.1 hours, more than offset-
    ting declines in March and April. Manufacturing overtime edged up by 0.1 hour
    to 4.7 hours in May. (See table B-2.)

    The index of aggregate weekly hours of production or nonsupervisory workers
    on private nonfarm payrolls increased by 0.3 percent in May to 100.2 (2002=100).
    The manufacturing index was up by 1.3 percent over the month to 95.5. (See
    table B-5.)

    Hourly and Weekly Earnings (Establishment Survey Data)

    Average hourly earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers on private
    nonfarm payrolls rose by 5 cents in May to $15.64, seasonally adjusted. Aver-
    age weekly earnings were up by 0.3 percent over the month to $528.63. Over
    the year, average hourly earnings grew by 2.2 percent, and average weekly earn-
    ings increased by 2.5 percent. (See table B-3.)

    http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm

    These are good hard working Americans, do you want to call their job crap?
     
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  9. Psychoblues
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    Psychoblues Senior Member

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    Oh, there are literally hundreds of references that could be provided that would reinforce what many like myself would consider common knowledge. Somehow, someday you're going to have to do some researching on your own and some understanding of what is readily available for you. Have you met a former Democrat convert lately?

    Psychoblues
     
  10. 007
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    007 Charter Member Supporting Member

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    Gee... I can't help but wonder if "SEPTEMBER 11th 2001" had anything to do with the decline in the economy?

    Holy shit psycho..... our economy is on FIRE considering what it's been through. But now I suppose you're going to tell me kerry and his "I'm going to raise your taxes again" strategy will be better for the economy.

    Uuuum.... no it won't. It'll throw this country back into a recession so fast it'll make your head spin.

    MORE TAXES, TAXES, TAXES. That's all you freakin' liberals understand isn't it? You won't be happy until we give ALL our money to the government. Because we're all to fucking STUPID to know what to do with our own money right?

    Pop another cold one asswipe. You're already off your rocker, might as well be shit faced and off your rocker.... or, are you already shit faced? Probably.... you think and talk like it.
     
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