"Out of the Silent Planet" by C. S. Lewis

Discussion in 'Reviews' started by Mustang, May 31, 2012.

  1. Mustang
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    Mustang Gold Member

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    Out of the Silent Planet by C. S. Lewis

    Long before The Chronicles of Narnia had come to the big screen, I had heard that Lewis was, in many respects, an author who promoted Christianity (the Catholic version, if I'm not mistaken), but I had never read any of his books.

    While doing some research, I stumbled across this particular book which is the first of a trilogy and decided to give Lewis' science fiction story a whirl. I figured, what the hell (no pun intended). After all, it's only 157 pp long.

    While the faith element is not 'preachy' in the least (a pleasant surprise, frankly), a reader won't have any trouble seeing the symbolism of the mystic spirituality and the good and evil present in the book and how it's representative of our supposedly 'fallen' world.

    Considering the time it was written (1938), it's a fairly good story which is told pretty much the way an Englishman would tell this kind of story, although it's not quite as stiff and proper as H. G. Wells writing style (who's actually referred to by the main character). It's also unexpectedly (and possibly unintentionally) funny in later pages after Ransom (the main character) meets Oyarsa.

    I will give one thing away. While most of the story takes place on another planet, the silent planet is Earth. I should also add that while this story is the first of a trilogy, the story stands all by itself.
     
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  2. peter18
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    peter18 Rookie

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    Hello, I struggled reading this book and I would like to discuss a few things. During his time living on Malacandra, amongst it inhabitants, what does Ransom learn about what the true needs are of a human being? What are some passages of the book that help describe this? What do the Malacandrians themselves value the most, and why? Also, what does Ransom learn he can (or even should) do without?

    There is no war, poverty, promiscuity and no avarice on Malacandra. Why? What do the sorbs and Oyarsa say are the reasons such things are found on Thulcandra (Earth)? Do you agree with the explanations they give? If so, give evidence that these explanations are correct. If you do not agree, say waht you think are the reasons for these ills.
     
  3. MHunterB
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    MHunterB Gold Member

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    Actually, CS Lewis never formally converted to the Roman Church.

    The Narnia series were written as children's books, and as a young child - I was 8 - I enjoyed them. Right up until the end...... (SPOILER ALERT). I just couldn't accept that ending in any way shape or form: I felt deceived, betrayed..... And yet I very much enjoy the stories still.

    A much more light-hearted series ostensibly for children is a set of about 9 books by a man named Edward Eager: they all tend to have 'Magic' in the title, eg 'Magic or Not?, 'Half-Magic'..... They are still fun to read as an adult.
     

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