Odds of climate change (for the worse)?

Discussion in 'Environment' started by Gurdari, Apr 14, 2009.

  1. Gurdari
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    Gurdari Egaliterra

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    So, we have increased the amount of CO2, and other gases in the atmosphere, we've polluted much of the planet, and altered many eco-systems. We have essentially disrupted Earth's equation, or the 'normal state' of things.

    So, what is likely to result?

    A) Nothing changes at all (despite the "elements of the equation" changing)
    B) Things change for the better (more fresh water, cleaner air, lots of vibrant ecosystems, the weather gets MORE predictable)
    C) Things change for the worse...(less fresh water, dirtier air, loss of vibrant ecosystems, the weather gets LESS predictable)

    Mathematically, option A is impossible.
    You decide which of the other two is more likely (and then give a shit if that's your nature).
     
  2. k2skier
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    k2skier Senior Member

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    C. Life on this planet will suffer the most from a lack of clean drinking water do to overpopulation and deforestation.
     
  3. KittenKoder
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    KittenKoder Senior Member

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    'A' is impossible because it's naturally impossible. Nature changes, without change and sometimes drastic and erratic change then life does not improve, evolution stops, and the world becomes as stagnant as Mars.
     
  4. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Kitten, when the change is drastic enough, evolution stops for a majority of the life existing at that time. And organisms survive the catastrophe based more on luck than adaption.
     
  5. krotchdog
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    krotchdog BANNED

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    co2 is so tiny its impossible to determine its effect, what is the biggest green house gas and what has the most effect on the heat of the planet?
     
  6. KittenKoder
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    KittenKoder Senior Member

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    You don't know much about evolution, do you. It is the most drastic changes that have caused the ecosystem to have evolved. For example the cockroach, it will survive even a nuclear holocaust, no matter what we do, they will always be there. They were too big before but still managed to survive and grow smaller, thus allowing them to live longer on less food. There are several other such species on the planet. A few more catastrophes and we could have many more, even a food source that is impervious to anything, allowing us humans to survive any event as well. Surviving a catastrophe itself is mostly luck for most species, but it forces adaptation in those who did survive on luck. This forced adaptation is what creates such huge leaps in evolution, the gradual steps take billions of years, while those spurred by massive changes in the environment can take only decades. Evolution and nature are not stopped by anything, nor can we "kill off the planet", it's impossible, but as I said, much of our flaws as a species may be a result of nature setting itself up for another such change.
     
  7. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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  8. KittenKoder
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    KittenKoder Senior Member

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    Again, ignoring all other sciences and possibilities and focusing on just one tiny (minute at this point) fact to drum up fear. Counter my reasoning with real reasoning. CO2 is a naturally occurring chemical that actually is a very important part of the ecosystem, just because it also causes warming doesn't make it less important.
     
  9. Sinatra
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    Sinatra Senior Member

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    I love some good CO2!

    The earth has been warmer...the earth has been colder.

    'Nuff said.
     
  10. KittenKoder
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    KittenKoder Senior Member

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    Thinking of planting in in door garden, I wouldn't be upset at having more CO2 to push out the CO from the neighboring freeway so they will grow better. As soon as it warms up enough (finger crossed) that is. It's been too cold these last couple years here to get anything started on time.
     

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