Oceans have acidified more in the last 200 years than they did in the previous 21000

Discussion in 'Environment' started by RollingThunder, Jan 23, 2012.

  1. RollingThunder
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    RollingThunder VIP Member

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    More research has come out highlighting the dangers of global warming's evil twin, ocean acidification. The health of the oceans is at severe risk from pollution and overfishing already so the damage from the accumulating acidification threatens the whole marine ecology which in turn threatens a significant part of mankind's food sources.

    Oceans have acidified more in the last 200 years than they did in the previous 21,000 years
    Daily Mail
    23rd January 2012
    (excerpts)

    Man-made carbon emissions have acidified the world's oceans far beyond their natural levels, new research suggests. In some regions, acidity levels rose faster in the last two centuries than it did in the previous 21,000 years, a study from the University of Hawaii has shown. Ocean acidity makes it harder for organisms such as molluscs and coral to construct the protective layers they need to survive.'
     
  2. skookerasbil
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    skookerasbil Gold Member

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    meh..........

    nobody cares
     
  3. Mr. H.
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    Mr. H. Diamond Member

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    That's quite acidificationistic.
     
  4. RollingThunder
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    RollingThunder VIP Member

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    To be more exact, nobody at your pathetic level of retardation cares. The intelligent people of the Earth care quite a bit, but you would, of course, know nothing about that, kookster.
     
  5. konradv
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    konradv Gold Member

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    For something no one cares about, you seem to spend an inordinate amount of time talking about it! Why would that be? Brother getting paid? :eusa_think:
     
  6. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Big deal. If every carbon bearing rock on the planet were burned it would lower the pH of the oceans from 8.1 to 8.0. And looky here, even wiki has to admit that acidification in the local areas probably won't be a problem because...wait for it....

    "In shallower waters, it's undeniable that increased CO2 levels result in a decreased oceanic pH, which has a profound negative effect on corals.[21] Experiments suggest it is also very harmful to calcifying plankton.[22] However, the strong acids used to simulate the natural increase in acidity which would result from elevated CO2 concentrations may have given misleading results, and the most recent evidence is that coccolithophores (E. huxleyi at least) become more, not less, calcified and abundant in acidic waters.[23] Interestingly, no change in the distribution of calcareous nanoplankton such as the coccolithophores can be attributed to acidification during the PETM.[23] Acidification did lead to an abundance of heavily calcified algae[24] and weakly calcified forams.[25]"


    So in one sentence they claim that acidified water will certainly kill everything, then in the next sentence they say..."well when we try and simulate the water we find that the little bastards actually become tougher (DAMN THEM!) and we find no evidence of acidified water actually killing anything (DAMN IT ALL TO HECK!)

    Which isn't surprising when one considers that the corals that will supposedly die out with the massive acidification actually evolved when the CO2 levels were 20X higher then now.

    More of those pesky facts you can't seem to figure out how to deal with.

    Poor little silly people.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paleocene–Eocene_Thermal_Maximum
     
  7. IanC
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    IanC Gold Member

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    ocean neutralization (not acidification) is yet another boogey man dreamed up by the CAGW crowd. the differences in pH that they are talking about are tiny and absolutely swamped by the natural variation in pH.
     
  8. RollingThunder
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    RollingThunder VIP Member

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    An even bigger lie than usual for you, walleyed, and complete nonsense too, of course. You are so clueless, it sets people's teeth on edge.




    In your deluded dreams, you pathetic retard.



    No they don't, you lying dimwit. 'They' talk about "a profound negative effect on corals", and then mention that the effect on a certain type of phytoplankton that form calcium plates, coccolithophores, may be more ambiguous and less well understood at present.




    LOLOLOL....total fantasy projection of your own insanity that bears no resemblance to what was actually said. In fact, the scientists have found that ocean acidification is having a profoundly negative influence on many marine life forms that form shells. They specifically mention the negative effect on corals in the piece you quote here but you're too ignorant (and too lazy to check) to know that corals are a different life form from "calcareous nanoplankton such as the coccolithophores".

    What is Ocean Acidification?
    NOAA

    Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, the pH of surface ocean waters has fallen by 0.1 pH units. Since the pH scale, like the Richter scale, is logarithmic, this change represents approximately a 30 percent increase in acidity. Future predictions indicate that the oceans will continue to absorb carbon dioxide and become even more acidic. Estimates of future carbon dioxide levels, based on business as usual emission scenarios, indicate that by the end of this century the surface waters of the ocean could be nearly 150 percent more acidic, resulting in a pH that the oceans haven’t experienced for more than 20 million years.



    How will ocean acidification affect marine life?
    (excerpts)

    Corals, calcareous phytoplankton, mussels, snails, sea urchins and other marine organisms use calcium (Ca) and carbonate (CO3) in seawater to construct their calcium carbonate (CaCO3) shells or skeletons. As the pH decreases, carbonate becomes less available, which makes it more difficult for organisms to secrete CaCO3 to form their skeletal material. For animals in general, including invertebrates and some fish, CO2 accumulation and lowered pH may result in acidosis, or a build up of carbonic acid in the organism's body fluids. This can lead to lowered immune response, metabolic depression, behavioural depression affecting physical activity and reproduction, and asphyxiation. Since the oceans have never experienced such a rapid acidification, it is not clear if ecosystems have the ability to adapt to these changes (1,2). Effects of ocean acidification on organisms and ecosystems are still poorly understood. Over the last few years, research has intensified significantly to fill the many knowledge gaps.

    Corals?

    Nearly 500 million people depend on healthy coral reefs for sustenance, coastal protection, renewable resources, and tourism, with an estimated 30 million of the world's poorest people depending entirely on the reefs for food (3).

    Coral reefs face two challenges from increasing atmospheric CO2. First, higher CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere are linked to warmer global temperatures, which in turn lead to warmer water temperatures. Corals are very sensitive to temperature change: a 1–2º C change in local temperature above their normal summer maximum can lead to a phenomenon called ‘bleaching’, whereby the corals expel their vital algal symbionts (algae which live in the cells of the coral), leaving the coral tissues translucent. In 1998, a single bleaching event led to the loss of almost 20% of the world’s living coral. Corals can recover from these events but repeated episodes are likely to weaken the coral ecosystem, making them more susceptible to disease and causing a loss of biodiversity. The second challenge faced by corals is the increasing acidity of the water caused by higher CO2 concentrations (4). Lowered calcification rates affect the reef ’s ability to grow its carbonate skeleton, leading to slower growth of the reef and a more fragile structural support, which makes it more vulnerable to erosion. By the middle of this century, the estimated reduction in calcification rates may lead to more reef area erosion than can be rebuilt through new calcification (5).
     
  9. newpolitics
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    newpolitics vegan atheist indy

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    This is terrible. We are messing our planet, and denying it to ourselves. Is it pathetic.
     
  10. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Messing it up big time, and people like Walleyes are cheering for the messing.
     

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