Ocean Temps Dropping

Discussion in 'Environment' started by westwall, Jan 8, 2011.

  1. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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  2. anuthervoice
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    anuthervoice pining for the fjords

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    it's true,
    we attempt to swim at Padre Beach........too cold!
    we venture to San Diego................too cold!
    La Jolya (sp?) ........too cold!
    I'm thinking mini-iceage again, like we had in the seventies.
     
  3. Matthew
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    Matthew Blue dog all the way!

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    [​IMG]
     
  4. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Well, Walleyes, this is from the Argo site.

    Global Change Analysis

    Ocean temperature and heat content
    Over the past 50 years, the oceans have absorbed more than 80% of the total heat added to the air/sea/land/cyrosphere climate system (Levitus et al, 2005). As the dominant reservoir for heat, the oceans are critical for measuring the radiation imbalance of the planet and the surface layer of the oceans plays the role of thermostat and heat source/sink for the lower atmosphere.

    Domingues et al (2008) and Levitus et al (2009) have recently estimated the multi-decadal upper ocean heat content using best-known corrections to systematic errors in the fall rate of expendable bathythermographs (Wijffels et al, 2008). For the upper 700m, the increase in heat content was 16 x 1022 J since 1961. This is consistent with the comparison by Roemmich and Gilson (2009) of Argo data with the global temperature time-series of Levitus et al (2005), finding a warming of the 0 - 2000 m ocean by 0.06°C since the (pre-XBT) early 1960's.

    And if you go to the site, right below this paragraph is a graph showing the rapid increase in heat in the oceans.
     
  5. Matthew
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    Matthew Blue dog all the way!

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    Rocks, in my graph up to 2006 it shows a raise, but within the graph in your post it shows it raising at a much decreased rate. WHY? Should it not be increasing.
     
  6. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Have to ask the Argo scientists. I have not kept up with that aspect of the measuring of the oceans.
     
  7. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Argo - part of the integrated global observation strategy

    Why do we need Argo?

    We are increasingly concerned about global change and its regional impacts. Sea level is rising at an accelerating rate of 3 mm/year, Arctic sea ice cover is shrinking and high latitude areas are warming rapidly. Extreme weather events cause loss of life and enormous burdens on the insurance industry. Globally, 8 of the 10 warmest years since 1860, when instrumental records began, were in the past decade.
    These effects are caused by a mixture of long-term climate change and natural variability. Their impacts are in some cases beneficial (lengthened growing seasons, opening of Arctic shipping routes) and in others adverse (increased coastal flooding, severe droughts, more extreme and frequent heat waves and weather events such as severe tropical cyclones).

    Understanding (and eventually predicting) changes in both the atmosphere and ocean are needed to guide international actions, to optimize governments’ policies and to shape industrial strategies. To make those predictions we need improved models of climate and of the entire earth system (including socio-economic factors).
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2011
  8. skookerasbil
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    skookerasbil Gold Member

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    Faither data..................its always going to be out there West........
     
  9. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Oh I know. olfraud data is sometimes good, most times crap.
     
  10. mdn2000
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    mdn2000 BANNED

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    Seems if all the CO2 was retaining the heat in the atmosphere the Oceans would get colder.

    Of course heat rises and CO2 is heavier than air so CO2 sinks. So if CO2 is heated up and is sinking is Old Crock saying heated CO2 sinks? Does the heat rise out of CO2 or does it just stay hot heating the Ocean.

    Seems like a lot of unanswered questions.
     

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