Ocean acidification could disrupt marine food chains

Discussion in 'Environment' started by Trakar, Aug 5, 2012.

  1. Trakar
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    Trakar VIP Member

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    Ocean acidification could disrupt marine food chains

    Nothing that hasn't been talked about extensively before, but this is a new study with a new assessment of the current state and the future potential.
     
  2. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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  3. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    And this study, published in SCIENCE, says your "could" (there's that charlatans word again) is a won't be a problem.....




    Phytoplankton Calcification in a High-CO2 World

    Ocean acidification in response to rising atmospheric CO2 partial pressures is widely expected to reduce calcification by marine organisms. From the mid-Mesozoic, coccolithophores have been major calcium carbonate producers in the world's oceans, today accounting for about a third of the total marine CaCO3 production. Here, we present laboratory evidence that calcification and net primary production in the coccolithophore species Emiliania huxleyi are significantly increased by high CO2 partial pressures. Field evidence from the deep ocean is consistent with these laboratory conclusions, indicating that over the past 220 years there has been a 40% increase in average coccolith mass. Our findings show that coccolithophores are already responding and will probably continue to respond to rising atmospheric CO2 partial pressures, which has important implications for biogeochemical modeling of future oceans and climate.





    Phytoplankton Calcification in a High-CO2 World
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2012
  4. Trakar
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