Obama to Overhaul 'No Child Left Behind'

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Modbert, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. Modbert
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    Modbert Daydream Believer Supporting Member

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    Obama's Overhaul of 'No Child' Law Creates High Anxiety, High Hopes - AOL News

    Sounds good to me. I know we have several teachers on here too. So what say you USMB?
     
  2. del
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    del BANNED

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    i think it's a load of shit that's never going to come close to happening.

    i further believe that after the administration gets its PR bounce for proposing it, it will sink like a stone, never to be heard of again, until the next election cycle.


    of course, i'm an optimist.
     
  3. Modbert
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    Modbert Daydream Believer Supporting Member

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    :lol: Oh politics.

    Why do you think it won't come to pass specifically?
     
  4. Anguille
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    Anguille Bane of the Urbane

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    Reading proficiency is more important than high level math. Some kids will never be able to read however. The point is we should keep striving to give kids the best we can up to age 16. Many are not reaching their potential. After 16 I think it's okay to take a break from education. Formal education is not the best path for all.
     
  5. random3434
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    random3434 Senior Member

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    No Child Left Behind has it's good points and it's bad points.

    The bad {from my pov} is expecting children with IQ's from 53 to in the 70's to pass the State Standardized Test every year. Instead of letting that child take a test in their ability level, they have to take it on the grade level they are in. So (in my case) I have third and fourth graders taking tests that most can't even read, since most are on a first grade reading level. Progress IS being made with them, but they are not on grade level, and some will never be. Yet they are expected to pass these tests, and if not the school gets punished? Not fair, so yes, some change in NCLB is welcome.

    (And no, I don't belong to a teacher's union)
     
  6. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I'll echo, Echo. I'd raise that top IQ or CSQ or ISQ or whatever the standardized testers like to call it, to at least 100 to expect 'hitting standards.' 85-99 there should be a three year span to 'demonstrate' an increase in knowledge gained. Below 85, progress should be seen, but realistically shouldn't be factored into any school report cards.

    ESL students should be given more time on the tests and read the questions and choices depending how long they've been exposed to English.

    I see no real reason for funding by the feds, rather the program should be integrated within the states' standards and goals.
     
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  7. chanel
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    chanel Silver Member

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    All kids can learn to read unless they are severely cognitively impaired.

    NCLB is absolutely "utopian" but I have little faith that an overhaul will have much impact. You cannot reform education without the support of parents and the local community. The Federal govt seems to ignore that.

    I don't see how they will be able to shortchange low performing schools. We all know where they are for the most part. And of course its not just "bad teacher" responsible for that, although it must be hard to get decent people to work in a war zone.
     
  8. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I agree that most kids with IQ's above 70-75 may learn to 'read,' however comprehending and applying are different than reading. Some of the students that are able to read aloud nearly flawlessly, are those that least understand the meaning of words, much less the theme of what they are reading. Unsurprisingly those are often the best at spelling too. Go figure. The brain is interesting indeed.
     
  9. Anguille
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    Anguille Bane of the Urbane

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    I've often wondered about that too.
     
  10. random3434
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    random3434 Senior Member

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    You've just described about 80% of the students with autism I've taught over the years.
     
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