NYT/Environmentalists Confused about Oil Slick's Vanishing...

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by mal, Jul 28, 2010.

  1. mal
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    mal Diamond Member

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    NYT: Gulf oil slick appears to vanish quickly - U.S. news - The New York Times - msnbc.com

    :rofl:

    The oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico appears to be dissolving far more rapidly than anyone expected, a piece of good news that raises tricky new questions about how fast the government should scale back its response to the Deepwater Horizon disaster.

    Or how about if it's going to Spend the Money it got from BP or give it back since this doesn't appear to be the Catastrophe that the Left was Hoping it would be.

    And is Barry going to continue to Insist on adding to his Unemployment Check Recipients by pushing for a Ban on Drilling?...

    These Questions and many, many more will be Answered on the next episode of, Hope?...

    :)

    peace...
     
  2. mal
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    mal Diamond Member

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  3. Nonelitist
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    Nonelitist BANNED

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    The earth is amazing at healing itself.
     
  4. martybegan
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    martybegan Gold Member

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    Most people only have the Exxon Valdez accident as a comparison, and the ecosystems of the two affected areas are vastly different.

    First, natural seepage of oil/gas into the Gulf is much higher than around alaska. This leads to larger populations of oil eating bacteria in situ.

    Second the increased temperature of the gulf both increases evaportation and also increases biological rates.

    Finally this accident developed over time, and farther from land. While the amounts were magnitudes larger, the response had time to develop, with far more craft availible for skimming, burning etc.

    Add in a few good storms (dilution is the solution to pollution) and there you have it.

    Still wondering about those supposed underwater plumes. Havent heard much on them recently.
     
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  5. mal
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    mal Diamond Member

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    Again... The CEO of BP was Correct... You can't make this Shit up! :lol:

    :)

    peace...
     
  6. RDD_1210
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    RDD_1210 Forms his own opinions

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    LOL! Thanks for the laugh. :cuckoo:
     
  7. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Biologists find 'dead zones' around BP oil spill in Gulf | Environment | The Guardian

    Scientists are confronting growing evidence that BP's ruptured well in the Gulf of Mexico is creating oxygen-depleted "dead zones" where fish and other marine life cannot survive.

    In two separate research voyages, independent scientists have detected what were described as "astonishingly high" levels of methane, or natural gas, bubbling from the well site, setting off a chain of reactions that suck the oxygen out of the water. In some cases, methane concentrations are 100,000 times normal levels.

    Other scientists as well as sport fishermen are reporting unusual movements of fish, shrimp, crab and other marine life, including increased shark sightings closer to the Alabama coast.
     
  8. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Energy, Agriculture, and the Environment: Dead Zones and the Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico - Climate Matters @ Columbia

    Catastrophic, tragic, disastrous: these are all words that have been used to describe the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. It is impossible to deny that these words apply – thick, goopy crude has already coated the beaches and estuaries of the Gulf, contaminating more than 120 miles of coastline. The spill is an unprecedented environmental and human disaster that is posing significant challenges to an already-beleaguered tapestry of ecosystems in the Gulf. It becomes even more harrowing to consider that the BP spill has occurred at a time of year exactly when agricultural runoffs begin to flow into the Gulf from the Mississippi river, exacerbating the infamously-named Dead Zone.

    Dead zones occur when runoff of nitrogen and phosphorus from agricultural fertilizers give rise to massive blooms of microscopic algae, which die and sink to the sea floor. Bacteria feast upon these dead algae, consuming oxygen in the water and reducing overall oxygen concentrations. Areas in which this occurs – and are not limited only to the Gulf – are known as either hypoxic (little oxygen) or anoxic (no oxygen). Anoxic systems have no oxygen present in the water; hypoxic systems have oxygen saturation in the range of 1-30%. Since fish and other marine biota cannot live below 30% saturation, both hypoxic and anoxic areas are termed “dead zones.”
     
  9. mal
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    mal Diamond Member

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    The gulf has an immense natural capacity to break down oil, which leaks into it at a steady rate from thousands of natural seeps.

    :rofl:

    :)

    peace...
     
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  10. Avatar4321
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    Avatar4321 Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member

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    You mean the earth fixes it's own problems? Who would have thought that a planet that's been around millions of years would have the ability to adapt and fix problems?
     
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