No rise in atmospheric carbon fraction over the last 150 years: University of Bristol

Discussion in 'Environment' started by concept, Jan 7, 2010.

  1. concept
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    concept Evil Mongering

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    Hot Air » Blog Archive » No rise in atmospheric carbon fraction over the last 150 years: University of Bristol
    Another AGW talking point hits the deep freeze. Won't make any difference to the mouthpieces though. :lol:
     
  2. OregonStream
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    How so? It's been know for some time that the oceans and the terrestrial biosphere sequester a significant "fraction" of our emissions. The remaining "airborne fraction" represents a continued annual accumulation of CO2. This study (yet to be thoroughly peer reviewed), doesn't change that, despite the misleading headline (later corrected by the AGU), but suggests that carbon sinks are not yet "saturating" or absorbing less carbon on average. That doesn't mean they won't in the future. If memory serves, the projections included in the IPCC process didn't assume strong feedback from saturating sinks or outgassing carbon reservoirs like thawing arctic permafrost. So it seems that this study will change little in terms of accelerated warming projections under their "business as usual" scenario. More discussion of it at
    climateprogress.org/2010/01/05/climate-science-atmospheric-co2-fraction-risen-dangerously-fast-rate-knorr/
     
  3. Toronado3800
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    File:CO2 increase rate.png - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    # ^ Dr. Pieter Tans (3 May 2008) "Annual CO2 mole fraction increase (ppm)" for 1959-2007 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory, Global Monitoring Division (additional details.)

    Another NOAA quote although from a random internet source.
    CO2 levels rise to a new record

    Interesting coming from Bristol, usually a decent school. My opinion is the Hot Air blog folks are grasping straws.
     
  4. Old Rocks
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    This is about the third time that one of these retards has posted this, apperantly thinking that the article is refering to the per centage of CO2 in the atmosphere.

    What the article refers to is the fact that of the CO2 emitted by industry, 45% stays in the atmosphere, and 55% is absorbed by plants and the ocean, primarily the ocean.

    Because of the warming of the oceans, and the approaching saturation of them with CO2, what the scientists are warning of is that at some point, more than 45% of the emitted CO2 from our industries will remain in the atmosphere, ramping up the warming even more rapidly.
     
  5. concept
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    concept Evil Mongering

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    Too bad it goes against your talking point material.

    I'd cancel my subscription if I were you.... but thankfully I'm not you.
     
  6. Old Rocks
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    Green Car Congress: CO2 and Methane Emissions Continued Rise in 2008 Despite Economic Slump

    CO2 and Methane Emissions Continued Rise in 2008 Despite Economic Slump
    24 April 2009

    Anthropogenic atmospheric CO2, fossil fuel emissions, world GDP, and world population for the past century. CO2 data from Antarctic ice cores (green points), Mauna Loa Observatory (red curve), and the global network (blue dots). Credit: NOAA. Click to enlarge.
    Emissions of two of the most important climate change gases increased last year, according to a preliminary analysis for NOAA’s annual greenhouse gas index, which tracks data from 60 sites around the world.

    Researchers measured an additional 16.2 billion tons of carbon dioxide (CO2)—a byproduct of fossil fuel burning—and 12.2 million tons of methane in the atmosphere at the end of December 2008. This increase is despite the global economic downturn, with its decrease in a wide range of activities that depend on fossil fuel use.

    Viewed another way, for every million molecules of air, another 2.1 molecules of carbon dioxide entered the atmosphere last year and stayed there—slightly less than the 2.2 parts per million (ppm) increase in 2007. Total global concentrations topped 386 ppm, compared to 280 ppm before the industrial revolution began in the 1800s.

    Think of the atmosphere and oceans taking in greenhouse gases as a bathtub filling with more water than the drain can empty, and the drain is very slow. We need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the point where they match levels that can be absorbed by Earth’s ecosystems. Only by reducing our dependence on fossil fuels and increasing energy production from renewable resources will we start to see improvements and begin to lessen the effects of climate change.

    —Pieter Tans, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESR
     
  7. Toronado3800
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    Thanks Rocks. I was looking for a deeper meaning.

    On a side note, increase the CO2 levels a bit and my garden should grow better lol.
     
  8. Old Rocks
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    Well, certain plants do, others do not. And most of the insects do even better than the plants that do.
     

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