Newsweek's Poll on the 10 Commandments

Discussion in 'Religion and Ethics' started by Adam's Apple, Mar 8, 2005.

  1. Adam's Apple
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    Adam's Apple Senior Member

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    "No matter whom I interviewed, the same five or six commandments kept coming up. And no matter whom I interviewed, I heard the same thing: "They should be displayed," said Dan. "They're just the basic rules that everyone can agree on."

    "And then I reminded them about the other four or five commandments. One: I am the Lord thy God. Two: Thou shalt have no other gods before Me. Three: Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain. Four: Keep the Sabbath. And then people started changing their minds."

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7120284/site/newsweek/page/2/
     
  2. MJDuncan1982
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    MJDuncan1982 Member

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    Typical that people walk around with one opinion without knowing all of the facts and how knowing all of them then changes that opinion.
     
  3. Merlin1047
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    Merlin1047 Senior Member

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    What's typical is that lots of people walk around ignorant. Then when they are exposed to a few facts by someone with an agenda, these ignoramuses can be led around by the nose.

    Government is not supposed to sponsor a religion. Government is also prohibited from interfering with the free exercise therof. Seems that second part is conveniently overlooked by those who seek to banish any mention of God from the public square. Also conveniently forgotten is the fact that the Constitution itself makes reference to God. Perhaps we need to get the white-out and purge that too.
     
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  4. musicman
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    musicman Senior Member

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    Amen, brother. Lies, damned lies, and statistics. The business of poll-taking has become so bastardized and politicized that the first thing I want to know is who's conducting it - so I can figure out that organization's particular agenda. A leading turn of a phrase here - a loaded question there - and PRESTO! Your poll arrives, like magic, at whatever preconceived conclusion you had in mind.

    It's hell being so jaded, but I find that I wind up with a lot less piss on my boots.
     
  5. ReillyT
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    ReillyT Senior Member

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    Does the Constitution make reference to god? I didn't think that it did.
     
  6. MJDuncan1982
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    MJDuncan1982 Member

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    I think that when a government official is acting qua government official, s/he is representing the government. You admit the goverment is not supposed to sponsor a religion. Therefore I feel that any person acting as the government should not endorse a religion. Examples include a judge placing the Ten Cs above his bench, a postman placing the Star of David on his mail truck, and a fire station displaying a Nativity Scene. Those individuals are there as the government. The free exercise clause clearly allows them to shed their role as a member of the government and exercise religion. Display things at home or on your personal car. But when you are performing a job that is paid through the government, don't endorse religion.

    And no, the Constitution does not make reference to God. The founders did that purging for us. You have simply conveniently created that 'fact' for your own purposes.
     
  7. Gem
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    Gem BANNED

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    The government of the United States is not establishing nor endorsing a religion by having a display of the ten commandments as a historical reference to one of the beginning influences of our judicial system.
    There were, of course, many, many legal codes and systems, religious and non-religious writs, etc. that influenced the formation of this nation...the ten commandments is a part of that, and denying that fact is silliness.

    Therefore, there should be no problem with a court-house displaying a statue, monument, etc. displaying the commandments in that historical context...our founding fathers were clear on the government ENDORSING religion (i.e. a judge wearing the ten commandments on his robes while presiding over a court case, or people who want the commandments displayed because they feel the US is a "Christian nation"), however respecting and recognizing the historical influences of our past is not at all the same thing, a we are doing our nation an enormous disservice not to recognize the difference.
     
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  8. MJDuncan1982
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    MJDuncan1982 Member

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    Nothing wrong with posting the 10 Cs qua historical monuments. However, they cannot be displayed in any way qua religious monuments.

    I believe that most of the court fighting is that you have people such as the Alabama judge who are displaying them as history - wink, wink. Obviously, people are suspect and want to make sure they are not there as religious monuments.
     
  9. Shattered
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    Who gives a rip if they're there? If you don't like it, don't stop and read them. Is putting something on a wall/door *really* infringing on your own religious (or lack thereof) beliefs? The only way I can see being annoyed with it, is if you're so insecure with your own beliefs that you're afraid if you see them too much, they're going to change your mind.. If that's the case, you weren't secure in your own belief.
     
  10. musicman
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    musicman Senior Member

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    A representative government means just what it says: It is a government of, by, and for the people. A community is governed by...itself! The establishment section specifically orders the federal government to keep its nose out of the matter of religion - it is a community matter, plain and simple. These are the words and intentions of our founding fathers.

    To the degree that the 14th Amendment has allowed the federal government - in the person of the courts - to insinuate itself into matters that are clearly none of its business, the 14th Amendment is bad law. Our founding fathers weren't a bunch of sneaky ACLU lawyers. By "Congress shall make no law....", they didn't mean, "But, of course, nobody said anything about the COURTS - wink, wink - nudge, nudge". The American Ideal is under attack, and the weapons are usurpation of the separation of powers, usurpation of states' rights, and usurpation of the U.S. Constitution. We can argue the finer points all day, but surely, anyone who loves liberty can see that our system of government has been perverted. If we don't right our steps, the path leads to tyranny - and the courts will take us there.
     
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