New Trucks in 07 will cost consumers millions!

Discussion in 'Economy' started by Emmett, Dec 31, 2006.

  1. Emmett
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    Emmett Active Member

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    I wonder how many of you are aware that you are about to get raped? In the Pocket! I mean raped!

    Starting tomorrow all diesel fuel sold in the United States will now be mandated to be refined to a point of only 15 ppm of particulate matter. The new engines for 07 are mandated to have reuseable particulate filters (ceramic) which will clean the rest out of the fuel. The engines are heavier allowing less freight to be transported, the fuel has less lubricity resulting in damage to older engines and the trucks are 10 to 15 % more expensive not to say anything about the maintanence of these new techno marvels.

    As many of you know I am a temporary truck driver and I can tell you that my 1999 KW with a Cat engine gets 20% less fuel mileage on the new fuel. Ouch!!!!! Twenty Percent!

    OK, less mileage, no lubricity, heavier design, less freight per truck transported = your screwed. I have no numbers but I would imagine consumers will feel an immediate effect from costs being absorbed by the Trucking industry being passed on.

    One of you article finders ought to dig up some info cause this is a good subject and we need some new material.
     
  2. 90K
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    90K BANNED

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    Alright so help me out here on this new filter and fuel deal. If you are getting 20% less fuel mileage now with the newer fuel why is it? And is this calculation used while driving the posted speeds? Or hammer down? You said less over all lube correct? Why not use bio-diesel? I mean besides cleaning your engine and possibly having to replace your fuel filter more often what else are the limitations? I know it is limited but are you OTR or local? Can't you do something to re program you primary computers to increase mileage with out leaning it to much? When you mention weight and less cargo, how much are we talking about? Several thousand pounds or what? I'm actually interested in these findings. I drove a truck in the Navy as an explosive driver so our methods were within DOT and I didn’t always have the greatest or most modern equipment unless we rented trucks. I knew it was a matter of time before the consumers were hit for moving supplies and goods via interstate highways. I also know that great amounts of work have been done to refine the railway systems to move goods and garbage throughout our country. As an independent driver where does this leave you in the messy loop?
     
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  3. Emmett
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    Emmett Active Member

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    Less lubricity of course harms an engine by providing less necessary lubrication to vital top engine componets. That in itself brings down effieciency of the engine while shortning life, less mileage etc,...

    Furthurmore the newer fuel because it is thinner it subject to heating faster. "Hot fuel" expands. It is supposed to be about 1.7 % or so. Point: You pump 100 gallons, you get 98.3 gallons. Truck holding 200 gallons just lost over 3 gallons per fill. 10 bucks. Multiply by how many times a year you fill = substantial figure.

    Engines that do not run at top eff. burn more oil. That is not conservation either.

    The newer engines are about 800 lbs heavier. Less mileage.

    The new particulate filters have to be serviced at 30,000 intervals. More cost.

    Older engines will not perform on newer Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel properly, more cost. More repair, less mileage.

    You may learn more about this subject at lots of sites but I would think that OOIDA (Owner Operators Independant Drivers Assoc) would have the best and most accurate information.
     
  4. theHawk
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    theHawk Registered Conservative

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    What is the purpose of this change in the fuel? Is it suppose to be cheaper? More environmentally friendly?
     
  5. theHawk
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    theHawk Registered Conservative

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    OK found some info on it on the epa webpage:


    http://www.epa.gov/cleandiesel/



    More:

    http://www.denverpost.com/business/ci_4472509
     
  6. Emmett
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    Emmett Active Member

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    While it is true that the new ULSD (ultra low sulphur diesel) will cut soot emisions considerably in older engines it is destructive to them because it does not contain enough lubricant to properly lubricate top cylinder engine componets. Those of us who operate pre 2007 equipment are very concerned about this. The 500 ppm (low sulphur) diesel fuel lacked lubricity as well but aftermarket products are available (additives) which helped us add lubrication and injector cleaner to the fuel. With 15 ppm diesel it would require adding too much cleaner and become destructive to the injectors themselves by causing cracking and eroding away the tips of them.

    It's a serious problem!
     
  7. insein
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    insein Senior Member

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    Wouldnt this be defeating the purpose (not that im suprised). If the fuel is safer on emmissions but you have to use 20% more of it due to its destructive side effects on engines, then it wouldnt really be that much safer. Using 120% of the Safer fuel vs 100% of the "unsafe" fuel probably has the same damaging effects to the environment.

    Whatever. I'm all for helping the environment where possible but government mandates that hurt industry AND still screw the environment make no sense.
     
  8. trobinett
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    The "secret" to this dilima, is NEW TRUCKS.

    The "players", read LARGE trucking companies, have been replacing their fleets with the more modern trucks, that were designed to run on the new fuel. Hence, better fuel mileage, AND lower emissions.

    Seems to be reasonable to me.
     
  9. 90K
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    Good point: There are allot of old unsafe rigs on the road today. Thus a push to sell massive newer units and make it un-attractive to operate older units. One thing I knew while I was driving is that the newer engines don't use the oil the older units once did! Now that was about 10 years ago. And prior to that say 15 years earlier I had operated a lot of heavy equipment and you could bet every morning I'd put at least 2 plus quarts in my machine.
    I did read a very interesting article out of a auto-manufacturing paper last summer while on a plane to Dallas and this article made mention of a new exhaust filter that would virtually rid all soot from diesel exhaust. It was being used in Europe--->go figure! and they found it had done wonders for the smoke and soot from diesels! It didn't go into specifics like changing or replacements and stuff like that. Also I would have thunk some group of engineers would have found an upper lube replacement to use to in place of the reduced sulfur. I haven't read the provided link yet but I'm on it.
     
  10. sitarro
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    sitarro Gold Member Supporting Member

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    Emmett, I have a question that comes up everytime I drive by a truck stop at night and see 300 or more trucks parked and running. How much fuel is being used and is it just to run air conditioning and a TV? Wouldn't it be a smarter idea for the truck stop to have electrical connections that could be rented for a reasonable fee? Seems like a tremendous amount of fuel is being used every night across the country not to mention the pollution.
     

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