New Threats to freedom

Discussion in 'Education' started by Akilloss, Mar 30, 2011.

  1. Akilloss
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    Akilloss Rookie

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    The new threats to freedom are numerous, and quite serious. In my opinion the most pressing danger to our society is the loss of the "freedom to fail" as enumerated by Michael Goodwin. The society and the mentality the loss of this freedom perpetuates, works largely to our detriment, and at the current rate the degeneration to our society may reach an irreparable state..

    In an America without the freedom to fail, no one knows the truth behind success. As Goodwin stated, it "takes away the opportunity to succeed." One way this happens is through what he calls "social promotion." This term refers to some of the ideas set up in the "Race to the Top" and "No Child Left Behind" programs. These programs essentially made it very difficult for students to be held back even if they exhibit below average performance. According to Goodwin, this policy, rather than being a benefit to the students, actually provides them a disservice. Many of these students, after being allowed to coast through both elementary and secondary school, upon graduation need to take college remedial courses in Math and English. Nearly 75% of all NYC students required additional courses in these basic subjects at the university level, attesting to their inadequate educational preparation for the world ahead. On a grander scale, when you consider the impact of increasing globalization, any kind of educational shortcoming in our society should be taboo.

    One point Goodwin failed to mention was the effect this kind of world would have on those who aren't striving for mediocrity. A motivated person in a generally lethargic society may find themselves pulled down as well. Though the society wouldn't be socialist in fact, it would feel like it in spirit. There would be no culture of social mobility, of upward movement, even outside of the educational system. Goodwin asserted that many Americans are suffering from "entitlement mania" believing that they can always be bailed out of life’s hardships. While this can be beneficial at times, especially in the case of social welfare programs, is there always a need for a safety net? If there is always a safety net, why should anyone strive? If all you need to do to live a happy full life is to meet the baseline, why would you exert yourself? A world like that, a world we are creeping closer to every day, where everyone is mediocre, the American dream is virtually nonexistent, and no one is extraordinary nor do they try to be. In our global world, one that does not revolve solely around us, this is not beneficial.

    As Michael Goodwin said "one of the most pressing new threats to freedom is the loss of the freedom to fail." This loss, though harmful enough by itself, gives a one-two punch, as it invariably robs us of our right to succeed and to pursue happiness. This grave new threat to freedom affects all of us, particularly students and will have dire effects if not rectified.
     
  2. Mr. H.
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    Mr. H. Diamond Member

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    I stopped reading at "In my opinion...".
     
  3. psikeyhackr
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    psikeyhackr VIP Member

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    Freedom to fail WHAT?

    Are these people success stories?

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0wk4qG2mIg]YouTube - Harvard Graduates Explain Seasons[/ame]

    And that was from around 1990. Doesn't that say some very strange things about education and society?

    No wonder we can't figure out what should happen when an airliner hits a skyscraper 2000 times its mass. :lol:

    psik
     

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