New roof and solar

Discussion in 'Energy' started by Nosmo King, Nov 24, 2009.

  1. Nosmo King
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    Nosmo King Gold Member

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    Next spring, the big projects around the Pimplebutt Estate are replacing the existing (and failing) asphalt shingle roof with a standing seam steel roof and installing photovoltaic solar panels.

    Has anybody any experience with such a project? Any tips? Suggestions?

    I'd really appreciate it!
     
  2. kyzr
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    kyzr Gold Member

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    No personal experience, but I think it depends where you live. For example, standing seam roofs are the only roof I'd use in a hurricane zone. As far as solar roof panels, its a gamble. Either you can orient them to catch the sun and break even at some point, or not. If you don't get enough sun you may never break even. Do you live in AK or FL, it makes a difference as to the power of the sunlight.

    The only advice I can give is to get several opinions as to how many watts/day or whatever the metric is for determining solar cost-effectiveness to see if it makes sense.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2009
  3. Screaming Eagle
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    Screaming Eagle Active Member

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    You ever notice how all the people who think solar panels are awesome don't have any on their house?
     
  4. Midnight Marauder
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    You will never see a return on your massive solar investment. It's not cost effective. You need to do a cost/benefit analysis, see how many years it will take for you to pay off this investment with lower utility bills.

    You will see that in most residential applications, you're talking 15-20 years. By that time you are already investing more money replacing panels, batteries, and other maintenance.

    You are far better served by making sure your home is better insulated, and doing a energy audit. Getting rid of any and all drafts and air leaks, shading windows that see the sun for a good part of the day, etc.

    Why anyone would ever consider the massive investment in residential solar without first doing an energy audit and tightening up their house, correcting existing problems and better insulating is beyond me. It's putting lipstick on a pig.

    I suppose it's the "feel good" part of the equation or some such shit.
     
  5. Midnight Marauder
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    By the way if you do steel for the roof, get white anodized. Reflect the UV instead of absorbing it.
     
  6. Old Rocks
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  7. Midnight Marauder
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    If you include reduced or eliminated gasoline use in the cost/benefit analysis it does indeed help the numbers, but you also have to factor in the cost of the new vehicle as part of the capital investment! And thusly, you are still looking at 10-15 years before you're in the black on this, for most residential applications. By then you're not only replacing panels and batteries, but the car as well!

    And still, why do ANY of this without an energy audit on the domicile and any and all corrective actions taken to reduce utility usage first? It simply makes zero sense to be proceeding with any type of "green" home energy measures without first reducing the existing waste issues.

    Most people find that they have reduced their utility bills by 40% just by tightening the house up and adding insulation, which has a payout of only a year to a year and a half because of the massively smaller capital investment for doing this.

    After you get the house tightened up and see the reduced utility bills, you'll also see any payout for adding solar shoot up to 20-30 years because of the greatly reduced utility usage you're now enjoying.

    THIS is why they want to artificially inflate everyone's utility bills with cap and trade, to make "going solar" appear to be a good investment.
     
  8. kyzr
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    kyzr Gold Member

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    If you drive the car to work, you probably don't get the benefit of the free recharge, i.e. you need to work 3rd shift.
     

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