New nanostructure for batteries keeps going and going

Discussion in 'Energy' started by Matthew, May 11, 2012.

  1. Matthew

    Matthew Blue dog all the way!

    Mar 16, 2010
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    Portland Oregon
    New nanostructure for batteries keeps going and going

    May 11, 2012 By Mike Ross

    For more than a decade, scientists have tried to improve lithium-based batteries by replacing the graphite in one terminal with silicon, which can store 10 times more charge. But after just a few charge/discharge cycles, the silicon structure would crack and crumble, rendering the battery useless.

    Now a team led by materials scientist Yi Cui of Stanford and SLAC has found a solution: a cleverly designed double-walled nanostructure that lasts more than 6,000 cycles, far more than needed by electric vehicles or mobile electronics.

    “This is a very exciting development toward our goal of creating smaller, lighter and longer-lasting batteries than are available today,” Cui said. The results were published March 25 in Nature Nanotechnology.

    This is good news as electric cars will be able to last longer with a full charge.
    Last edited: May 12, 2012

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