New LED traffic lights causing accidents

Discussion in 'Environment' started by RadiomanATL, Dec 12, 2009.

  1. RadiomanATL
    Offline

    RadiomanATL Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2009
    Messages:
    24,944
    Thanks Received:
    3,823
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Not here
    Ratings:
    +3,836
    LED lights: Going "green" causes unintended problem for public works crews in West Bend - WITI

    OK, So they save the city $100 per month at each intersection. $2400 total for the intersections. $28,800 per year. BUT it costs the city to have four, 2 person crews scrape the ice and snow from the lenses each snowstorm. I gotta think that the cost of these 8 guys doing this job during the winter months costs more than $28,800. Not to mention the traffic accidents that were caused by the lights.

    Hey, I have a solution. Put the old ones back up.
     
  2. Meister
    Offline

    Meister VIP Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2009
    Messages:
    25,900
    Thanks Received:
    8,099
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Conservative part of the Northwest
    Ratings:
    +8,100
    Yeah, but does it cut down on energy consumption? Screw the attrition, let's be green and save energy.
     
  3. Old Rocks
    Offline

    Old Rocks Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    46,474
    Thanks Received:
    5,416
    Trophy Points:
    1,840
    Location:
    Portland, Ore.
    Ratings:
    +10,318
    Of course, a real engineer, rather than going into a paraxism of political negativity, would simply do the same for the lights as they have for rear windows on cars. Have a small net of wires that heat on signal, and melt the snow off. Since the heat is not needed a majority of the time, it would consume little energy, and solve the problem.

    But it is more fun to go apolectic in a fit of Conservative idiocy than addressing a simple problem.
     
  4. RadiomanATL
    Offline

    RadiomanATL Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2009
    Messages:
    24,944
    Thanks Received:
    3,823
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Not here
    Ratings:
    +3,836
    Putting those things up would probably use as much energy as the old bulbs. It addresses the simple problem, but with the same end result of no savings.

    And an "apolectic in a fit of Conservative idiocy"? I think you misunderstand.
     
  5. Old Rocks
    Offline

    Old Rocks Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    46,474
    Thanks Received:
    5,416
    Trophy Points:
    1,840
    Location:
    Portland, Ore.
    Ratings:
    +10,318
    Now why would they use the same amount? The heat would only be on when needed. I am just a simple millwright, but even I can build a circuit that would turn on the heat only when the lights were covered with snow.
     
  6. RadiomanATL
    Offline

    RadiomanATL Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2009
    Messages:
    24,944
    Thanks Received:
    3,823
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Not here
    Ratings:
    +3,836
    You can build one, good.

    Can you build one that doesn't use as much energy as a lightbulb is the question. And can you then have them installed in all the traffic signals, along with a temperature sensor, at such a low cost to make the LED's still economically feasible.

    IOW:

    LED lights + Temp sensor + heating sensor + installation costs < savings from using LED's.

    I'm pretty sure that costs involved would not be recouped by the city easily or quickly. If at all.

    The LED lights for traffic signals were a good idea, but practically they fail in the real world. Use them in lights that are downward facing, like regular streetlights instead. No snow/ice problem.
     
  7. Old Rocks
    Offline

    Old Rocks Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    46,474
    Thanks Received:
    5,416
    Trophy Points:
    1,840
    Location:
    Portland, Ore.
    Ratings:
    +10,318
    Hmmmm. So why is there a temperature sensor? Or a heat sensor? Use your head.
     
  8. RadiomanATL
    Offline

    RadiomanATL Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2009
    Messages:
    24,944
    Thanks Received:
    3,823
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Not here
    Ratings:
    +3,836
    Ummm....because you don't want the thing to turn on in the summer when it makes no sense to?

    Take yer own advice.
     
  9. Old Rocks
    Offline

    Old Rocks Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    46,474
    Thanks Received:
    5,416
    Trophy Points:
    1,840
    Location:
    Portland, Ore.
    Ratings:
    +10,318
    The problem is not the cold. The only problem is when the light is covered with ice or snow. So you put a sensor out in front of the light. If the light is not recieved for a certain period of time, say triple the time for the light switch, the heat is turned on. When the ice or snow is melted then light is recieved, and the heat is turned off. It would not turn on in the summer. And the price of the additional circuit and wire probably would not equal one months savings.
     

Share This Page