Name a disease and lets discuss it

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by actsnoblemartin, Nov 9, 2007.

  1. actsnoblemartin
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    actsnoblemartin I love Andrea & April

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    We can discuss any disease listed in this thead.

    The disease im going to list is A-typical Trigeminal neuralgia. My best in the whole word has it, here is a link with more information because it is hard to explain it.

    http://www.umanitoba.ca/cranial_nerv...types.html#atn

    C. Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Atypical TN is characterized by a unilateral, prominent constant and severe aching, boring or burning pain superimposed upon otherwise typical TN symptoms. This should be differentiated from cases of typical TN that develop a minor aching or burning pain within the affected distribution of the trigeminal nerve.

    Vascular compression, as described above in typical TN, is thought to be the cause of many cases of atypical TN. Some believe atypical TN is due to vascular compression upon a specific part of the trigeminal nerve (the portio minor), while others theorize that atypical TN represents a more severe form or progression of typical TN.

    Atypical TN pain can be at least partially relieved with medications used for typical TN, such as carbamazepine (Tegretol®). MVD surgery is curative for many patients with atypical TN, but not as reliably as for those with typical TN. It is also important to note that rhizotomy procedures may be effective in treating atypical TN, but are more likely to be complicated by annoying or even painful numbness (i.e. deafferentation pain).
     
  2. eots
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    what about anal warts Martin...tell us about anal warts...
     
  3. actsnoblemartin
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    actsnoblemartin I love Andrea & April

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    http://www.fascrs.org/displaycommon.cfm?an=1&subarticlenbr=4

    ANAL WARTS

    What are anal warts?

    Anal warts (also called "condyloma acuminata") are a relatively common and bothersome condition that affects the area around the anus. They may also affect the skin of the genital area. They first appear as tiny blemishes, perhaps as small as the head of a pin, and may grow larger than the size of a pea. Usually, they do not cause pain or discomfort to afflicted individuals. As a result, patients may be unaware that the warts are present.
    Where do these warts come from?

    They are thought to be caused by the human papilloma virus which is relatively contagious. The virus can be transmitted from person to person, almost always by direct contact.
    Do these warts always need to be removed?

    Yes. If they are not removed, the warts generally grow larger and become more and more numerous. In addition, there is evidence that these warts can become cancerous if left untreated for a long time.
    What treatments are available?

    If warts are very small and are located only on the skin around the anus, they can be treated with medications, which are applied directly to the surface of the warts. This method, while relatively simple in concept, must be carried out with great care and precision by a physician to prevent injury to the normal skin surrounding the warts. This method usually requires several applications performed at various intervals over several weeks.
    Another form of treatment involves more rapid destruction of the warts using electrical cautery, surgical removal or a combination of the two. Laser surgery may also be used but has no advantage over other treatments. These procedures provide immediate results but must be performed using either a local anesthetic - such as novocaine - or a general or spinal anesthetic, depending on the number and exact location of warts being treated.

    Warts inside the anal canal usually are not suitable for treatment by medications, and in most cases need to be treated by cauterization or surgical removal.

    Must I be hospitalized for treatment?

    No. Almost always, the cautery and excision technique can be performed on an outpatient basis, and the patient can go home after the procedure.
    How much time will I lose from work after a cautery treatment?

    This depends on each individual situation and the extensiveness of warts removed. Most people are moderately uncomfortable for a few days after treatment, and pain medication may be prescribed. Depending on the extent of the disease, some people return to work the next day, while others may remain out of work for several days.
    Will a single treatment cure the problem?

    Not in most cases, unfortunately. Even with the cautery and surgical treatments that immediately destroy existing warts, many patients develop new warts after treatment. This occurs because viruses that cause the warts can live concealed in tissues that appear normal for up to six months or longer before another wart develops. New warts will often develop from the virus that was already present in the tissue, but these are not recurrences of warts already treated.
    As new warts develop, they usually can be treated in the physician's office, using either a chemical solution or the electrical cautery procedure. These treatments are performed every few weeks initially, then less frequently as new warts become smaller and less numerous.

    Sometimes new warts develop so rapidly that office treatment would be quite uncomfortable. In these situations, a second and occasionally third outpatient surgical visit may be recommended.

    How long is treatment usually continued?

    Follow-up visits are necessary for some months after the last wart is observed to be certain that no more warts occur from viruses living in the cells of skin.
    What can be done to avoid getting these warts again?

    In some cases, warts may recur repeatedly after successful removal, since the virus that causes the warts often persists in a dormant state in body tissues. Following are tips to avoid recurrence and reinfection:
    Continue observation for several months after the last wart has been spotted to improve the chances that both the warts and the underlying virus that causes them have been eliminated.

    Abstain from sexual contact with individuals who have anal (or genital) warts. Since many individuals may be unaware that they suffer from this condition, sexual abstinence or limiting sexual contact to marriage relationships will reduce your potential exposure to the contagious virus that causes these warts. As a precaution, sexual partners ought to be checked, even if they have no symptoms

     
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  4. eots
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    wow! that was really entertaining and informative Martin !...so what can you tell us about anal fissures a friend of mine thinks maybe she has one
     
  5. Nevadamedic
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    Nevadamedic Senior Member

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    Ewww you gave your friend anal warts? Gross. They have medication for that now.
     
  6. eots
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    no i was simply interested in warts and yes thanks to martins informative article if i ever do acquire or give anal warts to anyone i will know my treatment and medication options
     
  7. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    You seem to be a bit overly-fixated on the anus. DO try to move on.
     
  8. DiogenesDog
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    DiogenesDog Zen Bonobo

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    Gunny.

    That poster is way too anal for a Saturday morning.

    I have already been on a thaw out mission to the woods with a church urn of coffee and a cooler of PB&J sandwiches. The boys in the bivy were glad to see us coming. We had to take two to the county clinic. Some were vets some were not.

    How's that for a thread-jack?

    I AM
     
  9. eots
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    what kind of anus would hi jack martins lets discuss disease thread..appalling
     
  10. actsnoblemartin
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    actsnoblemartin I love Andrea & April

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    sure. here is some infomation.

    http://www.fascrs.org/displaycommon.cfm?an=1&subarticlenbr=3

    ANAL FISSURE

    What is an anal fissure?

    An anal fissure is a small tear or cut in the skin lining the anus which can cause pain and/or bleeding.

    What are the symptoms of an anal fissure?

    The typical symptoms of an anal fissure are extreme pain during defecation and red blood streaking the stool. Patients may try to avoid defecation because of the pain.

    What causes an anal fissure?
    A hard, dry bowel movement can cause a tear in the anal lining, resulting in a fissure. Other causes of a fissure include diarrhea and inflammation of the anorectal area.

    Anal fissures may be acute (recent onset) or chronic (present for a long time or recurring frequently). An acute fissure is usually due to altered bowel habits while a chronic fissure may be either due to poor bowel habits, overly tight or spastic anal sphincter muscles, scarring or an underlying medical problem.

    How can a fissure be treated?
    An acute fissure is managed with non-operative treatments and over 90% will heal without surgery. Bowel habits are improved with a high fiber diet, bulking agents (fiber supplements), stool softeners, and plenty of fluids to avoid constipation and promote the passage of soft stools. Warm baths for 10-20 minutes several times each day are soothing and promote relaxation of the anal muscles. Occasionally, special medicated creams may be recommended.

    A chronic fissure (lasting greater than one month) may require additional treatment. Depending on the appearance of the fissure, other medical problems such as inflammatory bowel disease or infections may be considered and testing may be recommended. A manometry test may be performed to determine if anal sphincter pressures are high. An examination under anesthesia may be recommended to determine if a definite reason exists for lack of healing.

    What can be done if a fissure doesn't heal?

    A fissure that fails to respond to treatment should be re-examined to determine if a definitive reason exists for lack of healing. Such reasons can include scarring or muscle spasm of the internal anal sphincter muscle. Those which continue to cause pain and/or bleeding can be corrected by surgery.

    What does surgery involve?

    Surgery usual consists of a small operation to cut a portion of the internal anal sphincter muscle. This helps the fissure to heal by decreasing pain and spasm. Cutting this muscle rarely interferes with the ability to control bowel movements and can usually be performed without an overnight hospital stay.

    A chronic fissure with a skin tag and a
    hypertrophied anal papilla, coronal view.


    How long does the healing process take after surgery?

    Complete healing occurs in a few weeks, although pain often disappears after a few days.

    Will the problem return?
    More than 90% of patients who require surgery for this problem have no further trouble from fissures. If the problem returns without an obvious cause, the person may need further assessment including anal manometry testing or an exam under anesthesia.

    Can fissures lead to colon cancer?
    No! Persistent symptoms need careful evaluation, however, since conditions other than fissure can cause similar symptoms.





     

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