Most Religious States

Discussion in 'Religion and Ethics' started by wavingrl, Feb 15, 2013.

  1. wavingrl
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    wavingrl Senior Member

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  2. TheOldSchool
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    TheOldSchool Gold Member

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    What's crazy is the list goes in order from red states, to swing-states, and then to blue states
     
  3. TheOldSchool
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    TheOldSchool Gold Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  4. wavingrl
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    wavingrl Senior Member

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    I reread the article and it seems to be based on regular church attendance. Only 19% for VT. I think CA had 35%.

    Not certain how useful the data would be. I don't go to church regularly but have religious beliefs.
     
  5. koshergrl
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    koshergrl Gold Member

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    Cali is full of Baptists and Catholics.
     
  6. konradv
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    konradv Gold Member

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  7. Pogo
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    Pogo Gold Member

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    Exactly - it's a flawed methodology:
    Overall, 40% of Americans nationwide were classified as very religious in 2012 -- based on saying religion is an important part of their daily life and that they attend religious services every week or almost every week. Thirty-one percent of Americans were nonreligious, saying religion is not an important part of their daily life and that they seldom or never attend religious services. The remaining 29% of Americans were moderately religious, saying religion is important in their lives but that they do not attend services regularly, or that religion is not important but that they still attend services. (Gallup)

    -- they're equating "attending services" with "being religious", which is a false equivalence. Those who either don't have services that reflect their outlook, or who don't believe organized congregations are a part of religiousness, cannot be counted. Thus, flawed methodology. I doubt Gallup would know what religion was if it galloped up to their home office and demanded "what in the wide world of sports kind of poll is this?".

    Just as disturbing, the original AJC article crows: "The good news? America, despite the best efforts of ice cream-creating non-creationists in Vermont, is still “a religious nation", and goes on, "a state with a small population apparently hellbent on tugging a loose thread of the moral fabric of American society". Self-righteous elitist crap. The AJC is usually a better paper than that.

    The comments on the article are interesting though.
     
  8. wavingrl
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    wavingrl Senior Member

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    I took that as dry humor. The article seemed to have been written in an informal style--might have been a blog--I can't recall.

    Anyway--in general, I would personally rank CA as less religious than VT.

    It seems like it was about this time last year that a vote on the 'selling liquor in grocery/package stores on Sunday' was pending. Lots of discussion--each county/city or town now decides for itself.
     
  9. Pogo
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    Pogo Gold Member

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    I have lived in both VT and CA but couldn't possibly presume to declare "how religious" the population of either one is, since religion is a personal matter. That question probably cannot even be answered at all; it would be like asking "what's the most beautiful state?" I have to wonder what point Gallup was trying to make by even attempting this question, flawed methodology and all. In one sense, everybody is religious, regardless how we choose to exercise it, or where, or when. At best they could ask nothing more than "how religious do you consider yourself" and leave out all the stereotype garbage about attending "services", as if that's the only manifestation there is. :bang3:

    Me, I happen to live in a lush forest teeming with flora and fauna, and as far as I'm concerned that's a lot more of a church than any building with a point on it where some guy in a dress chants in a language nobody speaks any more and the neighbors gather to cackle on who's not buying the lemming juice. But the Gallup methodology couldn't handle that.

    In the AJC story the verbage on Vermont was colourful, but I was more concerned with the phrase "the good news", which illogically projects the writer's own prejudices. I don't get the impression that writer contemplated the methodology at all.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2013
  10. wavingrl
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    wavingrl Senior Member

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    I agree--not really possible to measure 'how religious'. I suppose that is why I didn't pay a great deal of attention to what was written.
     

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