Mexicans Attack Americans!

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Bullfighter, Dec 31, 2010.

  1. Bullfighter
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    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eo6ReKjnPlg&feature=related[/ame]
     
  2. Mr. H.
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    Why didn't they just build a wall around that fort?
     
  3. Douger
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    Scary schtuff BullShitter. Maybe you and Mini-14 should get together and solve the "problem" ?
     
  4. Bullfighter
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    I guess for the same reason that the US can't even build a fence.

    But the Chinese could build a wall twice as long as the US border to Mexico. This might explain why the Chinese are more intelligent and richer than the typical American.
     
  5. rightwinger
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    rightwinger Paid Messageboard Poster Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    There was a wall. That is what they were fighting off of
     
  6. Mr. H.
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    I'm talking a wall around the wall. Ooh and a moat, with drawbridge.
     
  7. Sunni Man
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    THE TEXAS REVOLUTION: TEJANO PATRIOTS

    At the time of the battle, as many as eighty of the Alamo defenders were actually documented residents of Texas, but others had traveled to the fort from various states, volunteering their services for the revolution. Of the estimated 189 men who died in the Alamo, only six were actually born in Texas: Juan Abamillo, Juan A. Badillo, Carlos Espalier, Gregorio Esparza, Antonio Fuentes, and Andrés Nava. This work shall pay tribute to the Tejanos who died at the Alamo:

    Juan Abamillo was a native Tejano who had volunteered to serve in the Texas Revolution under the command of Juan N. Seguín. He had arrived at the Alamo on February 23, 1836 and he died there on March 6, 1836 as he fought alongside Travis, Crocket and the others.

    Juan Antonio Badillo was born in Texas and also served under Captain Juan N. Seguín. Badillo accompanied Seguín to the Alamo in February. But when Seguín was called out to rally reinforcements, Badillo stayed at the Alamo. Like his fellow revolutionary, Juan Abamillo, Juan Antonio Badillo died on March 6, defending the Alamo against Mexican Federal troops.

    Carlos Espalier (1819-1836) was born in Texas and was said to be a protégé of Jim Bowie. When he died at the Alamo, he was only seventeen years old.

    José María Esparza (1802-1836), also known as Gregorio Esparza, was born in San Antonio de Béxar, as the child of Juan Antonio and Maria Petra (Olivas) Esparza. He married Anna Salazar, by whom he had several children. Esparza had enlisted with Captain Seguín in October 1835. When General Santa Anna and his forces arrived in February 1836, Esparza and his family were advised to take refuge in the Alamo. Although Esparza could have left if he had desired to do so, he decided to stay, and his family remained with him. He tended a cannon during the siege and died when the Alamo fell on March 6, 1836. His brother, Francisco Esparza, recovered his body and arranged for a Christian ceremony and burial. Most of the defenders were not given the same respect.

    Antonio Fuentes (1813-1836) was born in San Antonio de Béxar, Texas. He was recruited by Juan N. Seguín and took part in the siege of Béxar. Fuentes had a falling out with the Seguín and Travis, but when the Mexican troops arrived in San Antonio, he stayed and fell with the other defenders.

    Damacio Jiménez, a native of Texas, also joined Seguín's militia. Damacio had served with Colonel Travis at Anahuac and entered the Alamo in late 1835. He died with the other defenders.

    José Toribio Losoya (1808-1836) was one of Capt. Juan N. Seguín's company of Tejanos. He had been born in the Alamo barrio on April 11, 1808, to Ventura Losoya and Concepción de Los Angeles Charlé. He deserted the Mexican army to enlist as a rifleman in Seguín's company. In February 1836, Losoya rode to the Alamo with Seguín and was there when the fortress fall. His wife and three children sought refuge in the mission chapel and survived the siege.

    Andrés Nava (1810-1836) was a native of Texas who had enlisted for six months service under the command of Juan N. Seguín. He took part in the siege of Béxar and later died while defending the Alamo on March 6, 1836.

    It is ironic that so few native Texas died in Alamo. One man who played a very significant role in the fight for independence was Juan Nepomuceno Seguín (1806-1890). A native of San Antonio, Seguín is probably the most famous Tejano to be involved in the War of Texas Independence. His story is complex because he joined the Anglo rebels and helped defeat the Mexican forces of Santa Anna. But later on, as Mayor of San Antonio, he and other Tejanos felt the hostile encroachments of the growing Anglo power against them. After receiving a series of death threats, Seguín relocated his family in Mexico, where he was coerced into military service and fought against the US in 1846-1848 Mexican War.

    One of the most famous Tejano patriots was José Antonio Navarro (1795-1871), who was one of the three Tejano Mexicano signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence (the other two were José Francisco Ruiz and Lorenzo de Zavala). Navarro was elected to serve twice in the Texas Senate, and Navarro County was named in his honor.

    It is important for the reader to understand that the several Tejano Mexicanos who died at the Alamo in the battle against Santa Anna were only a small representation of the many Hispanics who fought for freedom. To find out more about the Tejano Mexicano contribution to Texas / Tejas independence, you may want to visit this website:
    Hispanic Tejano Patriots in the Texas War of Independence

    The Hispanic Experience - Tejanos in the Texas Revolution
     
  8. Bullfighter
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    Fascinating! Would those "tejanos"/ Latinos/hispanics/Mexicans etc.....have gotten other Mexicans together to fight against Santa Ana if those Americans were not there? Most Mexicans,et al hid out in the town or ran away.
     
  9. BenMarbleMD
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    the solution is EZ
     
  10. BenMarbleMD
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    apparently....
     

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