Medicine Is the Site Of The Slippery Slope

Discussion in 'Religion and Ethics' started by Annie, Feb 25, 2006.

  1. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Certainly some will applaud, not me:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/mai...att25.xml&sSheet=/news/2006/02/25/ixhome.html
    The parents' website is here:

    http://charlottewyatt.blogspot.com/
     
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  2. nosarcasm
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    nosarcasm Active Member

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    that is always a tough situation to judge from the outside. In the end on can only hope that is what the child would want. In general I support the idea
    of the families making the call and not judges or doctors.
     
  3. Hobbit
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    Hobbit Senior Member

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    And I support letting everyone being allowed to live. Stephen Hawking is in pretty bad shape, but he'd rather be alive. I know plenty of people who have battled illness and disability all their lives, and not one would rather have been aborted.
     
  4. nosarcasm
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    nosarcasm Active Member

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    Sure but Hawking can tell us he wants to live. There are people that
    are in serious pain that want to die. My uncle had cancer allover, even
    with painblockers he was miserable. Things got worse for him by the day.
    You sit there on the outside and its bad. He took his own life, but if he
    would have been fallen in a coma I d cut his life support because I know
    he wanted to die. Its an individual thing. Most utmost importance should
    be given to the perceived interest of the person in question.

    In the case of kids I think the parents have to make the call. Maybe some
    will abuse that call but I dont know anyone better to make it.
     
  5. Bullypulpit
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    Bullypulpit Senior Member

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    There is a notion within the healthcar field of "futility of care". Hospital ethics panels around the country take this into account whenever they are making a decision to take an individual off of life support.

    Will continued care improve the life of the individual? Or, by all general expectations, will further treatment only lead to further deterioration of the individuals condition?

    It is an emotional and wrenching decision for families to make, but as medical technologies emerge that can sustain people until their bodies can simply no longer tolerate the interventions, it is one which more and more people will be faced with. Unfortunately, we live in a society conditioned by episodes of "E.R." where all medical problems can be resolved in an hour. These unrealistic expectations often stand in the way of making rational decisions regarding regarding withdrawl of extraordinary measures.

    There can also be other motives such as the disgraecful political grandstanding in the Terry Schiavo case. There was also a case, here in Ohio, involving parents who were eventually tried and convicted on homicide charges when life support was removed from their baby daughter.

    Until we are actually willing to accept death as a natural part of life, and that all lives cannot be saved, no matter what advances we see in medicine, we will continue to see such cases arise.
     
  6. Bullypulpit
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    Bullypulpit Senior Member

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    Spot on.
     
  7. rtwngAvngr
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    rtwngAvngr Guest

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    Yeah. Plus hope is too expensive in a socialized system. Right? Death with dignity = the rational decision. Your propaganda's dope, bully, but lies are always still lies.
     
  8. Hobbit
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    Hobbit Senior Member

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    Doesn't anyone have any fight left in them? This isn't some 70 year old cancer patient who's lived a full life and is ready to go ahead and die. This is a 2 year old who has barely had a chance at life. If she lives through this, she won't even remember it by the time she's my age. Also, since she's 2, she'll likely make a full recovery. The fat lady hasn't even cleared her throat yet and these doomsayers are ready to just stick a fork in this precious, little girl.
     
  9. Bullypulpit
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    Bullypulpit Senior Member

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    There's always hope. But when hopes are based upon unrealistic expectations, it leads to nothing but suffering.
     
  10. Bullypulpit
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    Bullypulpit Senior Member

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    She never had a chance at life to begin with. The only thing keeping her alive is medical technology, and the human body can only tolerate so much of that intervention before it finally shuts down. The fat lady has already sung...But you weren't listening.
     

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