McCain's Crazy White Preacher:

Discussion in 'Congress' started by rayboyusmc, Mar 29, 2008.

  1. jreeves
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    jreeves Senior Member

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    Another cluess post.....
    Obama denounces the statements but not the person. Obama knew that Wright's sermons were racially charged. MCcain's supporter not pastor for over 20 years is intolerate of other religions, is that so odd? Most religions believe that there religion is right. Wright attacks a race, not religious organizations.
     
  2. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    Donahe is to the Catholic church as Hagee is to the evangenlicals.




    He's a liar just like the others. So don't make a great deal about conservative morality. He dissed form Fatwell then praised him.

    Flip, flop, Flip flop.[/QUOTE]

    The usual spin, I see. Hagee is not McCain's preacher, nor has McCain attended Hagee's church for 20 years.

    Hagee agrees with McCain's views on Israel and tossed his money McCain's way and McCain took it.

    There's no flip flop because there's no comparison.

    DO try again.:rolleyes:
     
  3. CharlestonChad
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    CharlestonChad Baller Deluxe

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    The usual spin, I see. Hagee is not McCain's preacher, nor has McCain attended Hagee's church for 20 years.

    Hagee agrees with McCain's views on Israel and tossed his money McCain's way and McCain took it.

    There's no flip flop because there's no comparison.

    DO try again.:rolleyes:[/QUOTE]

    Who fucking cares? Obama isn't Wright. McCain isn't Falwell.

    If you like to watch horror movies, does that make you a violent person? I'm 100% positive that you know some people with some pretty extreme views. Do you have to stop being their friends because of it? If you don't end your friendship, does that mean you agree with them?
     
  4. jreeves
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    jreeves Senior Member

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    Who fucking cares? Obama isn't Wright. McCain isn't Falwell.

    If you like to watch horror movies, does that make you a violent person? I'm 100% positive that you know some people with some pretty extreme views. Do you have to stop being their friends because of it? If you don't end your friendship, does that mean you agree with them?[/QUOTE]

    Nope the horror movies didn't marry you, nor did they contribute to your political policies. Friends well it all depends on what extreme views you are talking about. I mean if I had a friend who thought that child molestation was ok I would definetly disown him.
     
  5. CharlestonChad
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    Church and State are separate in this country.

    Obama clearly does not express the same views, so it shouldn't even be relevant. This is a distraction. Why can't you see that? Attack Obama for his policies. If Wright had such a big influence on him, then you should have no problem showcasing how Obama mirrors Wright's sermons in his legislation, biography, or speeches.
     
  6. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    Who fucking cares? Obama isn't Wright. McCain isn't Falwell.

    If you like to watch horror movies, does that make you a violent person? I'm 100% positive that you know some people with some pretty extreme views. Do you have to stop being their friends because of it? If you don't end your friendship, does that mean you agree with them?[/QUOTE]


    More like the usual desperation from the left.

    As far as I know, no one has criticized Obama for merely accepting a contribution from a religious leader.

    Didn't Farrakhan throw his tacit support behind Obama? Does that not pretty much the vote from the Nation of Islam? It was pointed out and questioned, but that's about it.

    THAT is comparable to Hagee supporting McCain.

    The Obama-Wright relationship is NOT comparable to either.

    Just as the church Obama supports and has attended for the past 20 years and the pastor he has listened to for those 20 years is not comparable to watching horror flix and violence.

    If I have a friend that expresses extreme views I disagree with I do NOT attend his services regularly for 20 years. All smokescreen aside, THAT is tantamount to support for those views.

    And you know it.
     
  7. jreeves
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    jreeves Senior Member

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    Nope the horror movies didn't marry you, nor did they contribute to your political policies. Friends well it all depends on what extreme views you are talking about. I mean if I had a friend who thought that child molestation was ok I would definetly disown him.[/QUOTE]

    More than the other Democratic candidates for president, Obama has made faith a centerpiece of his campaign.

    Many of Obama's political views are "an outgrowth of his reading of some of the seminal parts of the Bible about doing unto the 'least of these' just as we would have done unto Christ," says Joshua DuBois, the campaign's director of religious affairs, paraphrasing verses in the book of Matthew. "He takes very seriously the numerous passages in the Bible that talk not only about poverty, but of people of faith taking God's words and extending them beyond the four walls of the church."

    But as Obama promotes faith as a means of uniting a diverse America around a shared set of values, he has at times found himself in a political minefield. To the left are liberals uneasy with religious intrusions into politics; to the right, conservatives who have questioned his Christianity and denounced his ties to Wright's Afrocentric church.

    Wright impressed Obama, and by 1988 the younger man found himself in the pews, listening to parishioners clap and cry out as Wright spoke of "the audacity of hope" in times of suffering, Obama writes in his bestselling 1995 memoir, "Dreams from My Father." In Wright's words that day, Obama glimpsed the deeper meaning he had been searching for in his work with the South Side's poor, who often had little to go on but faith.
    By his own admission, Obama's conversion was "a choice and not an epiphany." It owed as much to spiritual yearning as to a recognition of the power of the black church to change lives and society.
    Obama and his advisers have said that his faith has motivated legislation meant to benefit the poor, the uninsured, and minorities. In the Illinois state Senate, Father Pfleger recalls, Obama sponsored measures to clamp down on high-interest "payday loans" in poor neighborhoods and to require Illinois police agencies to record the race of motorists they stop as part of a state effort to monitor racial profiling. He also pressed for a bill requiring police to videotape interrogations of murder suspects, as a safeguard against coerced confessions.

    http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/0716/p01s01-uspo.html?page=3

    There you go if it helps....
     
  8. CharlestonChad
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    jreeves, I would like for you to provide an example where Obama expresses the same or similar extreme views that Wright has preached for 5 minutes out of 20 years of sermons. Obama has publicly denounced Wright's beliefs, so you will have to either provide evidence that Obama shares the beliefs, or base your assumption on a belief that Obama is lying and secretly agrees with Wright.

    GunnyL, how do you explain Obama's speech on Wright? Do you think that he was just lying? Do you think Obama shares the same beliefs as Wright?




    I'm trying to figure out what everyone is getting at with the Wright issue. Obama seems to whole heartedly disagree with Wright, so why is it an issue?
     
  9. jreeves
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    jreeves Senior Member

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    “I ceased to advertise my mother's race at the age of 12 or 13, when I began to suspect that by doing so I was ingratiating myself to whites,” he wrote.

    “There were enough of us on campus to constitute a tribe, and when it came to hanging out many of us chose to function like a tribe, staying close together, traveling in packs,” he wrote. “It remained necessary to prove which side you were on, to show your loyalty to the black masses, to strike out and name names.”
    The emotion between the races could never be pure,” he laments in “Dreams.” “Even love was tarnished by the desire to find in the other some element that was missing in ourselves. Whether we sought out our demons or salvation, the other race would always remain just that: menacing, alien, and apart.”
    After graduating from college, Obama eventually went to Chicago to interview for a job as a community organizer. His racial attitudes came into play as he sized up the man who would become his boss.

    “There was something about him that made me wary,” Obama wrote. “A little too sure of himself, maybe. And white.”

    “That hate hadn't gone away,” he wrote, blaming “white people — some cruel, some ignorant, sometimes a single face, sometimes just a faceless image of a system claiming power over our lives.”

    http://www.examiner.com/a-536474~_Trapped_between_two_worlds_.html

    Sounds a lot like the Rev. to me.
     
  10. CharlestonChad
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    "I have already condemned, in unequivocal terms, the statements of Reverend Wright that have caused such controversy. For some, nagging questions remain. Did I know him to be an occasionally fierce critic of American domestic and foreign policy? Of course. Did I ever hear him make remarks that could be considered controversial while I sat in church? Yes. Did I strongly disagree with many of his political views? Absolutely - just as I'm sure many of you have heard remarks from your pastors, priests, or rabbis with which you strongly disagreed.
    But the remarks that have caused this recent firestorm weren't simply controversial. They weren't simply a religious leader's effort to speak out against perceived injustice. Instead, they expressed a profoundly distorted view of this country - a view that sees white racism as endemic, and that elevates what is wrong with America above all that we know is right with America; a view that sees the conflicts in the Middle East as rooted primarily in the actions of stalwart allies like Israel, instead of emanating from the perverse and hateful ideologies of radical Islam.
    As such, Reverend Wright's comments were not only wrong but divisive, divisive at a time when we need unity; racially charged at a time when we need to come together to solve a set of monumental problems - two wars, a terrorist threat, a falling economy, a chronic health care crisis and potentially devastating climate change; problems that are neither black or white or Latino or Asian, but rather problems that confront us all.
    Given my background, my politics, and my professed values and ideals, there will no doubt be those for whom my statements of condemnation are not enough. Why associate myself with Reverend Wright in the first place, they may ask? Why not join another church? And I confess that if all that I knew of Reverend Wright were the snippets of those sermons that have run in an endless loop on the television and You Tube, or if Trinity United Church of Christ conformed to the caricatures being peddled by some commentators, there is no doubt that I would react in much the same way
    But the truth is, that isn't all that I know of the man. The man I met more than twenty years ago is a man who helped introduce me to my Christian faith, a man who spoke to me about our obligations to love one another; to care for the sick and lift up the poor. He is a man who served his country as a U.S. Marine; who has studied and lectured at some of the finest universities and seminaries in the country, and who for over thirty years led a church that serves the community by doing God's work here on Earth - by housing the homeless, ministering to the needy, providing day care services and scholarships and prison ministries, and reaching out to those suffering from HIV/AIDS."-Barack Obama
     

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