Mandatory Army Survey Says Atheists Unfit to be Soldiers

Discussion in 'Religion and Ethics' started by catzmeow, Aug 14, 2011.

  1. catzmeow
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    catzmeow BANNED

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    Mandatory Army survey says atheists are unfit to be soldiers | Rock Beyond Belief

    Smoking Gun proves Mandatory Army Spiritual Test is Religious | Rock Beyond Belief

    U.S. Army soldiers, and their spouses, are being forced to take a test that grades them on their spirituality. The results from this test are maintained and used by the Army for human resources decisions.

    Tell me...do you think that it is necessary for someone to be spiritual in order to be a good soldier? Do you think it is constitutional for U.S. soldiers to be required to submit to mandatory testing, asking personal questions about their faith (or lack thereof) that will be tied to their fitreps and promotions?
     
  2. Lokiate
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    Lokiate Super Beast

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    The SFT isn't saying Atheists are 'bad Soldiers', it's used as a tool for commanders to measure the overall well-being of their Soldiers, so that any problems can be assessed. Everything like this that the Army does is about combat readiness.

    In this case, if a Soldier did at once have religious beliefs, but now has a total lack of faith, it could be an indicator of depression, or other mental health issues. With things like PTSD, combat fatigue, and TBI, it's very important to look at things like this. A Soldier might not say they're depressed, because it shows weakness, or they might not even recognize symptoms they have, if they are suffering a brain injury, or have psychological issues. That's where good leadership comes in, they talk to the Soldier, and find out if their lack of faith is through an ideological/theological shift, or if it's something a lot more than that, and they get that Soldier the help he needs.

    No.

    Upon joining the military, a Soldier gives up some rights, even those guaranteed by the Constitution, however, it would be a violation of the Military EO policy to punish Soldiers, or use information gathered to withhold promotions and awards based on any religious preference.
     
  3. Sherry
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    Sherry You're not the boss of me Supporting Member

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    Damn, some people really are focused on making religion a boogeyman.
     
  4. Mad Scientist
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    Mad Scientist Deplorable Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    The actual survey results say nothing of the sort:
    Someone please point out where it say he's "unfit".
    Then he was asked:
    Dummy answered 'yes', I always say no to questions like that.

    Test taker is a overreacting, religion hating moron.
     
  5. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    Damn! if they had only done this in the 60's I would not have been drafted and wound up in Nam.
     
  6. C_Clayton_Jones
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    C_Clayton_Jones Diamond Member

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    Of course not. But the military has always seen ‘independent thinking’ as a double-edged sword. On the one hand you want solders to make sound judgments and think independently in the heat of battle, but independent thinkers have a tendency to ‘buck the system.'

    Unless the government can demonstrate a compelling reason to justify such promoting criteria on a religious basis, this type of program would be potentially un-Constitutional.
     

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