LA Oil Workers Going On Strike.

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by rcajun90, Dec 6, 2005.

  1. rcajun90
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    rcajun90 Member

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    A lot of interesting conversations going on in the local media around South Louisiana. I’m not the only one appalled at the way congress is treating us. Bush was willing to do not only the right thing but also what made economic sense. The right thing is to rebuild any American region hit by a natural or any kind of disaster even if they don’t have natural resources. Why? Because they are Americans and part of this country. It should be as simple as that.

    I think a lot of people that have been down here take the generosity and hospitality of the people on the gulf coast as a sign of ignorance. It is not but simply part of the culture and the way we were reared. If you push us into a corner we will fight back. Many people on the radio and in the newspapers have realized that if the federal government will not protect us and they will not allow us to protect ourselves then we have no choice but to fight back.

    One plan that I would support is to shut down the oil industry in the state for a few days or a week to get the attention of congress. I’m not sure how much damage it would cause the country to lose thirty percent of its oil supply. I wouldn’t support it beyond getting some members of congresses attention that those “Coonasses” (As someone on this board so eloquently referred to us) and rednecks are serious. I guess the country could dip into the strategic oil reserves… oh wait they are in South Louisiana.

    Some callers from a New Orleans radio talk show are actually advocating the destruction of the pipelines, rigs and refineries. This is coming from callers not newspaper columnists or other credible sources. This does show however the level of frustration. I would never support violence or vandalism. Also it would destroy the leverage we have and in the end hurt the state and the country. It’s simply amazing to me that a region of the United States needs leverage to get protection from the federal government.

    Many of you have never experienced anything like this. Those of you that fled from Rita in Southeast Texas got a taste of it but our society and civilization are very fragile. I will never forget a near riot that broke out over gas at a station in Baton Rouge four days after Katrina hit. Knifes and guns were pulled in the half mile line and the local police were called out to maintain order. If you push people in a corner even the easy going people from South Louisiana and Mississippi, they will strike back.

    Interesting article from the L.A. Times
    http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion...0,2886301.story?coll=la-news-comment-opinions
    He makes some sense showing how coastal erosion has destroyed the protection New Orleans use to have but he blames Bush for everything. This disaster was manmade but you can hardly point the finger at Bush since it has been coming for the last fifty years. I’m not sure why Bush didn’t support a coastal erosion bill other than the mood in congress is basically screw New Orleans. Perhaps he is picking his battles and he wants the levees done right first. I support him and trust him. It’s those wonderful folks in congress I have a problem with.

    Have a Merry Christmas everyone!
    :smoke:
     
  2. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Tell the truth, how much did you send to Illinois in 1987 with our floods? How much when Plainfield was substantially leveled? The feds did the same for us that they are doing for you, actually less. I did send money to the Red Cross for your area, I wonder if you did the same?

    Perhaps you did, then you aren't whining.
     
  3. Mr. P
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    Mr. P Senior Member

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    And you still wonder why many think yer MORONS!!!?

    Yeah, go ahead, blow the damn things up. See how long it takes to get hungry cuz ya don't have a job anymore...geeeezzzzz you folks are FUCKED UP!
     
  4. rcajun90
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    rcajun90 Member

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    To tell the truth not a dime. I was a freshman in college without parents working my way through it. How was Plainfield leveled? Oh my do you live in a flood zone? I'm now an adult that has a good job and I have sent money via the American Red Cross for countless hurricanes like Hugo and Andrew.

    Let me ask you a few questions. How did the "Great Flood of Illinois in 1987" level the area? Did thousands of people die and 100's of thousands of people displaced? People returning home for a look and leave in New Orleans are finding dead realtives in their homes so the true death toll to Katrina has is not yet final. I don't believe you can compare the two events but to be honest I don't know much about the 1987. I will google it and do some research.

    If the federal response was as feeble and inadequate as their Katrina response and the two events are remotely comparable then I would expect you to be more supportive. My post was directed at congress and not the countless Americans that have opened up their hearts and wallets. Also countless Americans like Dillioduck actually came down here to help and many are still here helping. Even people that want to screw New Orleans and Mississippi, should stop and think about the governments response to Katrina. What if a dirty bomb went off in Chicago? How would FEMA respond? MRE’s and bags of ice? Assuming you call Chicago home, how would feel if with money and hard work Chicago could be repopulated but congressmen from other regions simply say the whole place should be bulldozed. By the way consider my post a warning not whining. The whining will start when people get their energy bills.

    HAVE A MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!
    :banana:
     
  5. rcajun90
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    rcajun90 Member

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    What is yer? I never heard of that word. I guess I’m just one of those dumb coonasses. Did you bother to read all of my post? I don’t support sabotage. Those of you that only get your information from TV or the newspaper do not realize how many people are on the edge right now. I doubt if many of you can even comprehend what some people are going through. I’m not one of them. I was truly blessed. BTW Mr. P I said a prayer for you this past Sunday.

    HAVE A MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!
    :thanks:
     
  6. rcajun90
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    rcajun90 Member

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    This was all I could find on the 1987 flood. It hardly sounds like the same league
    as Katrina, Rita, Andrew or Hugo. However I bet it was for those that were victims. I wasn't a victim of Rita or Katrina. My house and my jobs are intact. No one I know lost their lives nor are they currently living in a tent or FEMA trailer. FEMA trailers are in short supply and as I type this some people are living in tents. It is a cold night by Louisiana and Mississippi standards. I hope those tents have heaters. I believe I will call the Red Cross and see if I can donate new heaters or money towards them for those poor people.

    Also it sounds like the federal and local governments are correcting the Chicago area flooding problems. If this isn't correct please let me know.

    "Flooding of rivers in the Chicago area is a natural phenomenon. Agricultural areas flood along with natural wetlands. The magnitude of these floods and the effects upon humans grew as the metropolitan area developed. Flood events of historical significance have occurred across the region during 1849, 1855, 1885, 1938, 1952, 1954, 1957, 1961, 1973, 1979, 1986, 1987, and 1996. Most record-setting flood stages and discharges in the region have been recorded since 1948.

    Flood control and watershed planning in the Chicago region is managed by a group of federal, state, and local agencies. These include the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resource Conservation Service, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, the Illinois Office of Water Resources, the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago, and storm water management agencies in each of the region's counties.

    By the early 1980s several watershed plans were developed to address flood problems along the North Branch Chicago River, Upper Des Plaines River, Lower Des Plaines Tributaries, Poplar Creek, Upper Salt Creek, and the Little Calumet River. These plans will eventually implement 43.9 miles of channel modifications and 41,128 acre-feet (13.4 billion gallons) of floodwater storage facilities, including the Tunnel and Reservoir Plan. Flooding remains a serious problem along the main channel of the Des Plaines River and the Little Calumet River and many smaller streams. A 1998 estimate puts annual flood damages at $41,459,000 in the Chicago area, affecting nearly 20,000 homes and businesses.

    Local, state, and federal agencies and individuals have become increasingly aware of the unmitigated impacts of urbanization on drainage and flooding. The Metropolitan Water Reclamation District implemented the first stormwater detention ordinance in 1972. This ordinance required new developments to detain a portion of the increased runoff and to restrict the outlet capacity of the detention basin to a predevelopment discharge. It has now become standard practice to provide stormwater detention within new subdivisions to control the rate of runoff to predevelopment rates.

    The 1986 flood was triggered by widespread regional rainfall with varying intensity and duration, which had been preceded by two weeks of nearly continuous rain falling across northern regions of the Des Plaines, North Branch Chicago, and Fox River watersheds. Flooding in rivers and streams across Lake, McHenry, northern Cook, northern DuPage, and northern Kane Counties resulted. The 1987 flood was generated by localized high-intensity and shorter duration rainfall which dropped up to 13 inches of rainfall in less than 24 hours, largely in Cook and DuPage counties. The 1986 and 1987 floods generated enough public awareness of the continued problems of drainage and flooding for the Illinois General Assembly to pass legislation authorizing the formation of countywide stormwater management programs."

    HAVE A MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!
    :mm:
     
  7. Mr. P
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    Mr. P Senior Member

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    Yeah, I read another of yer whinny posts. I had nothing better to do at the time. :funnyface
     
  8. rcajun90
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    rcajun90 Member

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    Your command of the language is very impressive. I never heard of fancy words like yer and cuz. I guess we really have a long way to go with education in Louisiana.


    HAVE A MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!
    :dance:
     
  9. Mr. P
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    Mr. P Senior Member

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    Yes, I guess you do have a long way to go. I'll never hold it against ya though. Start by getting out more into the "real" world, the La outback ain't what ya think it is. ;)
     
  10. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Well about 5k people were made homeless in 1987 out of a pop C40k in my li'l town in Dupage County. That's about 8% if my math serves me right. Now, about 75% of those had the comprehensive homeowner's and flood insurance, which eventually helped out. In the meantime, the National Guard and Salvation Army and Red Cross helped those that didn't.

    Neighbors, much like Baton Rouge did for y'all, stepped up, with housing, food, and toys for kids.

    Plainfield was something else. Not as wealthy and much more devastation. I think it was a type 5 tornado. Unlike NO or even Dupage, while more sparsely populated, much more death and even destruction, given what was there. Much of it was razed by the tornado, including a high school and parochial school, during school hours. Didn't make the news? NO sure as hell did, for days BEFORE it hit.
     

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