Kafr Kassem massacre could not be forgotten by statute of limitations

Discussion in 'Israel and Palestine' started by P F Tinmore, Oct 31, 2012.

  1. P F Tinmore
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    P F Tinmore Platinum Member

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    NAZARETH, (PIC)-- The Palestinians of occupied territories in 1948 and the people of Kafar Kassem city could not forget the massacre where they remained steadfast despite the Israeli attempts to expel them.

    Fifty-six years have passed since the heinous massacre committed by the Israeli occupation forces against the people of Kafr Kassem town, an Arab village located on the border of 1948-occupied Palestine with the West Bank.

    On October 29, 1956, the Israeli army ordered that all Arab villages near the Jordanian border be placed under a wartime curfew. The order was given to border police to 'shoot on sight' any villagers violating the curfew before most of the Arabs from the villages could be notified. Any Arab on the streets was shot despite that many of them were at work at the time.

    The Israeli decision resulted in 49 Arab civilians dead, including women, children and elderly people.

    Legally based, the human rights organizations believe that the massacre is a war crime could not be subject to any statute of limitations, where calls are increasing for the prosecution of the occupation on the massacre as an ugly war crime carried out by the occupation forces.

    Kafr Kassem massacre could not be forgotten by statute of limitations
     
  2. kvetch
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    kvetch Devout UK Hindu-Jew

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    I read that the whole Arab Israeli population was put under martial law for the first 20 years of Israel's existence.

    And that any of the 700,000 or so pals expelled who tried to return to their homes were viewed as "infiltrators" and could be shot on sight.

    Despite that several thousands did make it back.
     

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