Jurrasic Park? Decoding of Mammoth Genome Might Lead to Resurrection

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by KarlMarx, Dec 19, 2005.

  1. KarlMarx
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    KarlMarx Senior Member

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    This is too much like the movie, "Jurassic Park". The DNA of an extinct wooly mammoth is being sequenced. It is possible that the complete DNA sequence may be available in about a year. When that happens, it will be possible to create a woolly mammoth and some scientists are talking about bringing them back...

    http://www.livescience.com/animalworld/051219_mammoth_dna.html
     
  2. USViking
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    USViking VIP Member

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    It would be so cool to resurrect extinct
    animals. Maybe the Sabretooth Tiger
    will be next.

    This paragraph from the link irritated
    the hell out of me, though:

    How could they possibly tell that humans wiped
    out the mammoths? And how can they explain how
    the Asain and African elephants then survived,
    both living amongst a denser human population,
    especially in Asia?

    Besides having to put up with legions of academics
    who will not give the West credit for a damn thing,
    we also have to put up with legions who now blame
    humans for environmental misbehavior back in the
    fircken Stone Age.

    Next thing we know some tweed-brained professor
    will say he has found a direct connection between
    the mammoth-slayers and Messrs Bush and Cheney.
     
  3. 007
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    007 Charter Member Supporting Member

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    I know it has ethical ramifications as well as scientific, but, what would it hurt?
     
  4. archangel
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    Good eating 'Wooly Mammoths'that is...I remember seeing a National Geographic special about finding a 'Wooly Mammoth' frozen...They were selling the delicacy for high price per pound! :cool:
     
  5. MtnBiker
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    MtnBiker Senior Member

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    Who was selling the meat? The National Geographic people?

    Sounds like an episode of Northern Exposure.
     
  6. MissileMan
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    MissileMan Senior Member

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    They could very well become a catalyst for a virus spreading from some other species to humans. The avian flu is at this time having difficulty moving from birds to humans. What if it had no difficulty moving to mammoths and then further mutated to become a killer mammothian flu that is easily passed to humans?
     
  7. archangel
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    that could be true...being that I am not in a serious mode! :teeth:
     
  8. MtnBiker
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    MtnBiker Senior Member

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    Preserved frozen remains of woolly mammoths have been found in the northern parts of Siberia. However, the popular notion that these bodies were 'flash frozen' and perfectly preserved is a myth propogated by pseudoscientists such as Immanuel Velikovsky. Preservation is a rare occurrence, essentially requiring the animal to have been buried rapidly in liquid or semi-solids such as silt, mud and icy water which then froze.

    This may have occurred in a number of ways. Mammoths may have been trapped in bogs or quicksands and either died of starvation or exposure, or drowning if they sank under the surface. They may have fallen through frozen ice into small ponds or potholes, entombing them. Many are certainly known to have been killed in rivers, perhaps through being swept away by river floods; in one location, by the Berelekh River in Yakutia in Siberia, more than 9,000 bones from at least 156 individual mammoths have been found in a single spot, apparently having been swept there by the current.

    To date, thirty-nine preserved bodies have been found, but only four of them are complete. In most cases the flesh shows signs of decay before its freezing and later desiccation. Stories abound about frozen mammoth corpses that were still edible once defrosted, but the original sources (e.g. William R. Farrand's article in Science 133 [March 17, 1961]:729-735) indicate that the corpses were in fact terribly decayed, and the stench so unbearable that only the dogs accompanying the finders showed any interest in the flesh.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammoth
     
  9. archangel
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    ther goes my idea about competing with "Burger King" I was going to introduce a "Wooly-Bully Mammoth Burger' to put em to shame! ;)
     
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  10. KarlMarx
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    KarlMarx Senior Member

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    <center><img src="http://www.alexross.com/TW1017-Bronto-To-Go.jpg"></center>
     

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